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Mixology (26)

With the advent of spring, and the warm winds slowly sweeping through New York City, I am reminded of new birth. This cyclical times of year brings to life the bulbs that have been hiding beneath soggy soils, the buds on sidewalk hedges, and the nude shades of fresh, farmer’s market eggs. Quail Eggs and Coastal Living

A quail egg, speckled in cream and brown, pairs nicely with a modern and minimalist kitchen.  Less is more with carefully chosen palm leaves and gourds. Photo by Tria Giovan for Coastal Living.

Crow Eggs and Scandinavian, Midcentury Modern Accents

Karl Anderson photographs a saccharine, Scandinavian dinging room complete with white Moroccan tagines, mid-century modern curves and light wooden accents. The interior’s colors highlight the blotched bluish-green to pale olive of a crow egg.

The Brown Gloss of a Common Loon Egg

The glossy, lacquered sheen of a common loon egg lends itself to the high impact, brown hue of a living room or den. Brown is considered a color of comfort and security. David Hicks, who is considered the James Bond of interior design, painted the walls and ceilings in his apartment a “Coca-Cola color”. The trend of a dark brown space took off ever since. Room image via Shelterness.

Spring has sprung! Egg-celent! Don’t mind my horrible puns…

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The Fat Radish

Situated in a location that’s a little off the beaten track in the Lower East Side, the restaurant is surrounded by shops that flip their sign to “closed” early in the day.  The hidden location doesn’t seem to deter any of the food aficionados and long-haired men in clever button downs and Sergeant Pepper blazers.

The Fat Radish The Fat Radish

“What do I know of man’s destiny? I could tell you more about radishes.” – Samuel Beckett

Part of the “No Farm, No Food” – locavore movement, the Fat Radish describes itself as, “… a simple, elegant and airy room that still retains the industrial feel of London’s original Covent Garden marketplace. The cuisine does not fall into one particular category but rather returns to a way of eating before food was constantly classified. The menu is bound by one philosophy , simple, healthy, delicious dishes created with well-sourced, seasonal ingredients.” The Fat Radish The Fat Radish The Fat Radish

Nothing says ‘classy’ quite like a branded trucker hat. The Fat Radish The Fat Radish The Fat Radish The Fat Radish

Fat Radish Silkstone

Silkstone, a creative agency in New York City, designed the restaurants slightly dilapidated but clever decor. When the owners began creating the restaurant in 2010 they were faced with a challenge – how do you a turn an old Lower East Side building (that was formally a sausage factory) into a light and airy dining space? Sourcing the right materials was of utmost importance. With 1970s Covent Garden as an inspiration, the team used old barn wood, unique light fixtures, and renovated the original brick floors, achieving the goal of making the space feel open and light. Along with the challenge of the dining space, there was also the challenge of the kitchen; with no kitchen space existing, a full build out of one was necessary. The Fat Radish The Fat Radish

The eponymous radish table plate, rather than the usual crusty bread offering.The Fat Radish The Fat Radish

Scotch Egg, cornichons, seeded mustard. The Fat Radish

Celery root pot pie, black garlic, gruyere cheese.

   The Fat Radish - Grilled Cheese

The Fat Radish

Kale Caesar Salad, Anchovy, Croutons, Bacon and Egg by candlelight.

The Fat Radish

The dessert menu…

The Fat Radish

Petite pot du creme.

The Fat Radish

My favorite aspect of the restaurant, as is with my entire life, a toss up between the food or the decor. Woody, rustic and comfortable with some Chinese graffiti (to pay tribute to its location) has me feeling as if I’m about to eat at an in-law’s quaint yet modern country home. The ambiance  is really lovely, and something I would like to replicate.

Sam Sifton from the New York Times puts it best, “The Fat Radish is a pleasant and pleasing restaurant for all this, however: a handsome young golden Labrador, camera-ready, hard not to like. To sit in its dining room as light plays off the huge mirror in back, candles flickering everywhere, eating rillettes and drinking wine, is to experience a small part of the New York that leads people here inexorably and always will.”

FatRadish Inspired Industrial Decor

1. Industrial Pendants – A run of larger 1940/50’s British industrial pendant lights by Maxlume, salvaged from a factory in the north of England. Cast aluminium with thick domed glass diffusers. We’ve left these lights in the original green paintwork, simply beeswaxing them to bring out the patina. Large runs of British industrial lighting like this a an increasing rarity.

2. Ayers Skull & Bones Decanter by Ralph Lauren Home. Feeling sinister? How about I mix you up some arsenic and old lace…

3. Candela Cube by Sonia Lartigue, 2010 from the Museum of Modern Art Design Store. This table lamp is made using traditional Mexican craft techniques. When lit, the mirrors create beautiful, geometric optical effects. Handmade. Requires one incandescent 25W bulb (bulb not included).

4. Sturdy and tough industrial table by Woodland Imports.

5.  Pewter Stoneware Large Covered Casserole Dish by Juliska.

6. Greengage Wall Clock – Quirky as the British industrial example that inspired it, this weathered wall clock will add good-natured gravitas to your kitchen or family room. Gracious green laminated face with metal hands. Quartz movement.

7. Bring home the elegance of French-inspired cutlery with this LeBrun Laguiole Ivory style set.

8. The silver, metallic stool is built of beautiful elm wood reclaimed from buildings and furniture pieces that graced the eclectic Qing dynasty. The piece is meticulously hand built and finished by time-honored craftsman utilizing over 120 different processes, by Madera Home Furniture.

What restaurant would you choose to live in?

 

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Mixology (23)

This Dessert That Room

The layered creams and soft chocolatey browns of a delicious Italian tiramisu lend themselves to salvaged wood, mismatched chocolate tones, and Italian leather. Room via Do You Fancy This?

This Dessert That Room

The Magnolia Bakery cupcakes, as made famous by Carrie Bradshaw, are buttery old-fashioned treats. The delicate pistachio cupcakes are whipped up with pistachio meringue buttercream and topped with the nut itself! These special treats also have hand designed cupcake wrappers. The room is by Robert Passal presented at the 2012  Hampton Showhouse. The deep greens, playful feminine pinks, and delicate vanilla-colored detailing match the delicious dessert perfectly. The statement wallpaper is a custom design withBlack Crow Studios. Image via Tilton Fenwick.

This Dessert That Room

A classic creme brûlée (also known as burnt cream) revolves around custard and hardened caramel colors. A mint leaf adds a bit of color to the earth toned palette. A room that captures the crisp geometric patterns of a doily, as well as the dark tones of an earthenware ramekin is both calming and reminiscent of burnt sugar via Design Milk.

This Dessert That Room

A fluffy whipped marshmallow cloud is feminine and delicate in this lovely Baked Alaska photograph (and recipe) by Sarah Phillips via baking911.com. Dainty gold leaf plates with Victorian touches are reflected in this rustic yet opulent shabby chic haven. Photographed by anson smart, styled by lara hutton for Country Ctyle Australia as scanned by Dust Jacket Attic.

This Dessert That Room

Inspired by the tempting visions of French pastry shop windows yet with the patriotic colors of the American or French flag, the fruit tart (tartes aux fruits) is a perfect summer treat – recipe of the vegan tarts and photos by Green Sage.  Blueberries, strawberries, peaches, cherries and mangoes in the desserts translate into blues, reds, oranges and peaches in a bright, high contrast bedroom created by Interior designer Janet Gridley. The whimsy of mismatched historic wallpaper, granny squared quilts, nautical hints, red lacquered side tables and rope fixtures are bold and cozy. Images and complete room by D Magazine, here.

What dessert would YOU choose? Bon Appétit!