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Lucite in the Sky with Diamonds

This just in – Lucite is not longer for stripper heels or for your lewd cousin Sally. Although I always associated the material with wanton fantasies and ladies of the night, its style resurgence has begun!

The material can be used to preserve items in a resin like substance – it also has a bevy of other uses including in CDs, tattoo ink, ceramics, rocket fuel, fiber optics, dental fillings, aquarium windows, hockey rinks, jewelry, cosmetic surgery, and basically everywhere one looks. Perspex, a type of lucite, has been used as a surface to paint on (rather than traditional canvas) by Salvador Dali.

Is it a table? A book? A Painting? Salvador Dali, Freud, Moise et le monothéisme, 1974  The texts chosen above were actually based in alchemy. 

Hailed as a chemical wonder and used in World War II bombers. Lucite was able to be explored in more domestic settings after the war. Here is an illustration from Modern Materials for Modern Living: Bakelite Plastics, 1957. I am assuming the windows are plexiglass. Image found HERE.

Simply put, lucite is a shatter resistant, acrylic alternative to glass. The material was developed in 1928 in various laboratories, and was first brought to market in 1933 by Rohm and Haas Company, under the trademark Plexiglas. It has since been sold under many different names including Lucite and Perspex. I was going to attempt to give you the full and official name but all the “poly”, “methyl”, “acrylate”, “methylpropenoate”, and other chemically words had be a bit tongue tied.

 

A simple and clean solution to a watch display. Image found via The Glitter Guide, HERE.

Lucite backed bar stools and  the notable Oly Studio lighting. 

The translucent material camouflages itself to match any decorating scheme. Image via DecorPad. 

I spy Domino Magazine! That coffee table allows the magazines to look as though they are in a shadowbox on display. The lucite screen divider separates a room without shrinking its size. Image screen cap found via Lonny Magazine.

Image found HERE.

Contemporary gray foyer entry design with lucite acrylic console table, tall slat back chair, owl umbrella stand, white & black abstract art, white branch candle holders, gray walls paint color, crown moulding and crystal chandelier by Lori Graham. Image found HERE. 

A pop of color is calmed down by the clarity of lucite! Image by Tara Seawright, found HERE.

Cinderella would have made an entrance down this staircase whether or not she was wearing her glass (or lucite) slipper. The bannister is designed by Thomas Britt. Hanging on the stairs is Walking Cake II by Laurie Simmons. Photos by Andi Hatch and Francois Halard. Image found HERE. 

I would not mind reading, writing, or working at this wonder of a desk. Image via Atlanta Homes Magazine.

HOW DO I LIVE IN A CHEMICALLY MADE CLEAR RESIN LIFE?

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