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Mixology (20)

In preparation for the onset of autumn (the leaves are a’changing and there’s a crisp in the air), I bring you a mix and match of light sweaters perfect for the in-between weather of seasonal changes.

Sweater: A bold, Southwestern motif lends an on-trend accent to a slouchy collegiate sweater by Topshop found here. / Room: Retreat to a Southwest hideaway, at home. Live in a handcrafted cove of pine with distressed, hand-painted turquoise finish. The details give it the necessary character and situate your in your own personal desert oasis: twigs, conchos, cacti, a stampede of horses, antlers and painted flowers. Las Cruces bedroom found here.

Sweater: Knitted from the softest¬†angora-blend¬†and adorned with two intarsia tigers, Mulberry’s¬†light-brown¬†sweater is a sartorial conversation starter. The relaxed fit and flattering neutral hue make it a weekend fail-safe, found here.¬†/ Room:¬†Designer Valentino‚Äôs drawing room plays on rich browns, and deep contrasts between dark and light, where a L√©ger Peinture Murale¬†(1932)¬†and a Ming-dynasty tiger sit regally atop a mantle. Can you find the mammal?¬†Photographs by¬†Jonathan Becker via Vanity Fair August 2010.

Sweater: Like the Salvador Dali couch, or Marilyn Monroe’s famous red pair, these lips were sealed with a kiss! To purchase, click here.¬†/ Room: Live inside of St. Valentine’s house daily with this ultra themed dining room. Heart plates, red lacquer, color blocked drapes, and the whimsy of someone’s Barbie dollhouse! Photography by¬†Donna Griffith¬†and¬†esign by¬†Jennifer Brouwer Interior Design, via Coco + Kelly!

 

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El Toreador

Bullfighting, also known as¬†tauromachia¬†¬†is a traditional spectacle of Spain, Portugal, southern France, India, and some Latin American countries (Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela and Peru)¬†in which one or more¬†bulls are baited, and then slaughtered in a¬†bullring¬†for sport and entertainment. Whereas the popularity of this sport has fallen in the past few hundred years, it is still regarded as a “fine art” by some (and a bloodsport by others). Per usual, traditional, culture, and sport are mired in controversy.

(Images: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 )

Whatever one’s stance on the activity may be, it still cannot be argued that the¬†professional¬†toreros¬†(also called “matadors”) and the bullring has captured the imagination of many artists throughout the years. The colors, the speed, and the marvel of a show create a vignette in which humanity and mortality are often on display. ¬†I have never been to a bullfight, nor do I really condone the practice – but in the end it is not my religions, culture, or history. So much of this world is based on attempting to understand the importance ¬†and significance of another people’s past.¬†Rather than a competitive sport, the bullfight is more of a ritual which is judged by¬†aficionados¬†(bullfighting fans) based on artistic flourishes and a man’s command of animal. Ernest Hemingway said of it in his 1932 non-fiction book¬†Death in the Afternoon: “Bullfighting is the only art in which the artist is in danger of death and in which the degree of brilliance in the performance is left to the fighter’s honour.”

Edouard Manet¬†,¬†Mlle. Victorine in the Costume of a Matador,¬†Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1862 – (An early instance of cross dressing and “passing” in art, Manet purposely includes a pink sash and a reprint of Goya’s bull’s behind Victorine.)

SOTHEBY’S NEW YORK – NOVEMBER 14, 2007,¬†CONTEMPORARY ART,¬†FRANCIS BACON, 1909-1992, STUDY FOR BULLFIGHT NO. 1, 2ND VERSION , signed, titled, and dated 1969 on the reverse , oil on canvas , 78¬ĺ x 58? in. 200 x 147.7 cm.

VILLEGAS CORDERO, Jos√© (Sevilla, 1844 – Madrid, 1921),¬†La muerte del maestro,¬†√ďleo sobre Lienzo,¬†330 x 505 cm.,¬†h. 1884, Image via Museo Bellas Artes de Sevilla

“Bullfight #5”¬†by¬†Salvador Dali
P.P. Konchalovsky, Bullfight. 1910

 Pablo Picasso, Bullfight, the death of the torero (Course de taureaux Рla mort du torero)

Rene Daniels, Painting on the Bullfight, 1985, Photo by Peter Cox, Image found HERE (The colors and quickness of the bullfight reduced to abstraction!)

Jacqueline Kennedy, her hostess the Duchess of Alba, and the Countess of Romanones attend a bullfight in Seville, 1966, Image found HERE.

Magazine:¬†Harper’s Bazaar Singapore,¬†Issue:¬†March 2012,¬†Editorial:¬†Before Night Falls,¬†Model: Wang Xiao |Wilhelmina|,¬†Stylist:¬†Kenneth Goh¬†|United Management|,¬†Photographer:¬†Simon Upton, Image found HERE.

Kiss of the Matador, Vogue Japan, Image found HERE.

Oscar de la Renta is inspired by Cubism and Matadors in this collection, found HERE. 

Emilio Pucci 2012 matador skirt, HERE.

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An Artist’s Dwelling (4)

Egon Schiele was an Austrian painter and protege of the Austrian symbolist (and lover of the female body), Gustav Klimt. Schiele is most famous for his twisted bodies, hyper sexualized sketches, grotesque, and almost endless self-portraits. He is considered an early expressionist painter who leans toward figurative painting. Figurative art is considered to be drawn from actual objects or persons – therefore it is representational rather than based in imagination. Expressionist painting allows the artist to transform works based solely on emotion and subjective perspectives and distortions – often these works are not in the realm of “the real”. Technically speaking an expressionism painting and a figurative painting are at odds with one another – one aims to be wholly based in “fact” and the other in “feeling”. This dichotomy adds a layer of beautiful confusion to Schiele’s paintings.

Egon Scheile, The Little City II (View from Bohemian Krumlov), 1912-1913, Oil on Canvas (Wikipedia Commons)

Egon Schiele, Fräulein Beer, 1914, Oil on Canvas (Wikipedia Commons)

Early in the artist’s career, while studying with Klimt, he met a woman named Valery (Wally) Neuzil. Some consider this woman to be a mistress of Klimt, however she appeared as a model in Schiele’s works as well. Together, they escaped what they considered “the conservative society” of Vienna to the countryside of Neulengbach. The rent was inexpensive because it was so far from this city (what Brooklyn is the NYC). This allowed Schiele to afford more space for his studio. ¬†This home became a gathering place for many delinquents and children in the area – it was also where Schiele painted several youths in questionably pornographic situations (many of whom were considered below the age of consent). Paris von Guetersloh, a young artist who was Schiele’s contemporary, remembered that the establishment was overrun with them:

They slept, recovered from beatings administered by parents, lazily lounged about – something they were not allowed to do at home – combed their hair, pulled their dresses up or down, did up or undid their shoes … like animals in a cage which suits them, they were left to their own devices, or at any rate believed themselves to be.

Egon Schiele, Kauernde

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