Article
0 comment

Ciderfeast 2015

On the sunny banks of the East River, from the producers of Pig Island, the NYC Hot Sauce Expo and Brisket King (and Queen) of NYC, came Ciderfeast! The event featured select regional, national and European ciders from more than a dozen brewers pouring over 30 beverages. The sweet summer refreshments were also paired with tons of hot dogs and live folk music.

The alcoholic libation, made from the fermented juice of apples, is most popular in the United Kingdom, but has been having a bit of resurgence in the states! (I say resurgence because our founding father, John Adams, began his days with a draft of hard cider. A common habit among Colonial America.)

Everyone knows the old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” While the factuality of this statement could stand some prodding, it is true that cider has some research-backed health ben­e­fits from its high level of antioxidants. So, perhaps I went to Ciderfeast for my health? How responsible.

The real reason I loved going to Ciderfeast (while pregnant and unable to sample the wares, nonetheless) is because my husband is gluten-intolerant. For those with a sen­si­tiv­ity to gluten, Hashimoto’s disease or celiac disease, cider is one of the most delicious drink options out there. From dry to sweet, sparkling to flat, most of the brews are wheat, barley and hops free!

We sampled:

Article
1 comment

Affordable Art Fair, New York

With a private viewing that began on April 2, the four-day event known as the Affordable Art Fair, hosts 78 galleries and a huge array of contemporary art at The Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea. On Thursday April 3, I called a gaggle of friends and joined a Thursday night party for young collectors. We browsed contemporary art while sipping cocktails by Slow & Low Rock and Rye.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Max and Suzy take in the sites, (top right) Lancaster Ballroom, The Savoy by Siobhan Doran, 2010, Giclee Print. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery. (bottom left) Freeze by James Burke, 2014, featuring mini Lego pieces. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery.
 
Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC

The concept is simple, thousands of original paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs all under one roof, ranging from $100-$10,000, with more than half priced under $5,000. The work of young, emerging artists hangs alongside household names, while a wall for recent graduates of local art schools, and the Art Students League of New York, provides a chance to snap up work by a future master.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Bottom Left) Davy & Kristin McGuire’s Fairies Series, mixed media video in jars from 360 by SHOPART, a print of the quintessential Greek, diner cup from the Rebecca Hossack Gallery.

This was my fifth visit to the Affordable Art Fair and yet, I still found myself inspired by the myriad of color frames, new concepts, and young buyers. The fair aims to make collecting universal, they even offer online guides for beginning a collection, framing or hanging art, or introducing art to children! Confused about gouache versus acrylic? Why not use the fair’s glossary for media and techniques.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Left) Plaster sculpture, Arching Specimen, 2013 by Umberto Kamperveen, (top middle) four Buddhas by Garam Lee.

Since 1999, the globally traveling event has  welcomed over 1.4 million people and have garnered over $316 million sales in art, with fairs in cities including London, Bristol, Amsterdam, Brussels, New York, Singapore, Hamburg, Mexico City, Rome, Milan, Seattle, Stockholm and Hong Kong.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Nathan Vincent’s knit yarn and foam weapons and explosives, (top right) PURE EVIL serves as guest artist for Coates & Scarry gallery. Various, pop-art and spray-painted canvases faux drip to the floor in ‘Mel Ferrer’s Nightmare’ and Andy Warhol’s Nightmare, (bottom right) LuLuPa Hutong, Wood Cut, by Chinese, young artist Huang Kai.
 
AffordableArtFair_2014_4(top) Stitched Up by Katharine Morling (bottom left) Erica peruses the offerings from Uprise Art, an NYC-based collectors club (bottom right) Doublefaced No. 23 by Sebastian Bieniek. With eye-pencil and lipstick, Sebastian draws on the side of the model’s face creating portraits that are both humorous and somehow unsettling.

Way back in 1996, Will Ramsay opened Will’s Art Warehouse in southwest London to bridge the public’s increasing interest in contemporary art and London’s highbrow gallery scene. This eventually turned into the Affordable Art Fair. The founder explains, “I do not want art for a few any more than I want education for a few, or freedom for a few.” Here’s to art for everyone.

Article
2 comments

Leith Clark X Warby Parker

The second I received a preview of the Leith Clark collaboration with Warby Parker, I screamed, “Holy Sexy Libraryian, Batman!” You’ll recognize Leith Clark and her unmistakably feminine eye from Harper’s Bazaar U.K. and Italian Vogue, her styling of red carpet stunners, and from the pages of Lula magazine, which she founded.

Be Spectacular. BESPECTACLED! 

Leith Clark X Warby Parker

Photo by Hannah Thompson.

The collection was inspired by the 1960s, librarians, pearls, brass, opera glasses, violet,  nerdy girls. Leith wanted to recreate the glasses you had when you were a kid — or that your dad wore — the kind of glasses that were only relegated to childhood dress-up. Leigh also loves big, thick glasses on little, tiny faces. All five frames (Aurora, Greta, Marva, Wednesday and Willow) have a distinct shape and feature heaps of charm and whimsy.

Leith Clark X Warby Parker X The Walkup

As if these specimens weren’t cool enough, for every pair of glasses sold, a pair is distributed to someone in need. A percentage from each sale goes to Girl Up, a United Nations Foundation campaign mobilizing American girls to raise awareness and funds for UN programs that provide life-changing opportunities to girls around the world.

Keyholes, circular frames, slight cat-eyes, rimless lenses and more! 

Leith Clark X Warby Parker X The Walkup 2Photos of Zoe Kazan by Pamela Hanson.

Warby Parker - Leith Clark Collection