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Affordable Art Fair, New York

With a private viewing that began on April 2, the four-day event known as the Affordable Art Fair, hosts 78 galleries and a huge array of contemporary art at The Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea. On Thursday April 3, I called a gaggle of friends and joined a Thursday night party for young collectors. We browsed contemporary art while sipping cocktails by Slow & Low Rock and Rye.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Max and Suzy take in the sites, (top right) Lancaster Ballroom, The Savoy by Siobhan Doran, 2010, Giclee Print. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery. (bottom left) Freeze by James Burke, 2014, featuring mini Lego pieces. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery.
 
Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC

The concept is simple, thousands of original paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs all under one roof, ranging from $100-$10,000, with more than half priced under $5,000. The work of young, emerging artists hangs alongside household names, while a wall for recent graduates of local art schools, and the Art Students League of New York, provides a chance to snap up work by a future master.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Bottom Left) Davy & Kristin McGuire’s Fairies Series, mixed media video in jars from 360 by SHOPART, a print of the quintessential Greek, diner cup from the Rebecca Hossack Gallery.

This was my fifth visit to the Affordable Art Fair and yet, I still found myself inspired by the myriad of color frames, new concepts, and young buyers. The fair aims to make collecting universal, they even offer online guides for beginning a collection, framing or hanging art, or introducing art to children! Confused about gouache versus acrylic? Why not use the fair’s glossary for media and techniques.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Left) Plaster sculpture, Arching Specimen, 2013 by Umberto Kamperveen, (top middle) four Buddhas by Garam Lee.

Since 1999, the globally traveling event has  welcomed over 1.4 million people and have garnered over $316 million sales in art, with fairs in cities including London, Bristol, Amsterdam, Brussels, New York, Singapore, Hamburg, Mexico City, Rome, Milan, Seattle, Stockholm and Hong Kong.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Nathan Vincent’s knit yarn and foam weapons and explosives, (top right) PURE EVIL serves as guest artist for Coates & Scarry gallery. Various, pop-art and spray-painted canvases faux drip to the floor in ‘Mel Ferrer’s Nightmare’ and Andy Warhol’s Nightmare, (bottom right) LuLuPa Hutong, Wood Cut, by Chinese, young artist Huang Kai.
 
AffordableArtFair_2014_4(top) Stitched Up by Katharine Morling (bottom left) Erica peruses the offerings from Uprise Art, an NYC-based collectors club (bottom right) Doublefaced No. 23 by Sebastian Bieniek. With eye-pencil and lipstick, Sebastian draws on the side of the model’s face creating portraits that are both humorous and somehow unsettling.

Way back in 1996, Will Ramsay opened Will‚Äôs Art Warehouse in southwest London to bridge the public‚Äôs increasing interest in contemporary art and London‚Äôs highbrow gallery scene. This eventually turned into the Affordable Art Fair. The founder explains, “I do not want art for a few any more than I want education for a few, or freedom for a few.‚ÄĚ Here’s to art for everyone.

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An Artist‚Äôs Dwelling (14) ‚Äď Hope Gangloff

Born in Amityville, New York in 1974, Hope Gangloff’s childhood seems to weirdly coincide with the publication and subsequent production of the Amityville Horror books, movies and murders. Chalking this up to an unrelated coincidence, let us resume Gangloff’s “normal biography”. Based in New York City, the artist is currently¬†represented by¬†Art Department, Richard Heller Gallery¬†and¬†Susan Inglett Gallery.

Hope GangloffHope Gangloff is known for creating vibrant and truthful portraits of her friends as a way to share her view of modern American life. ¬†The subject matter often captures a generation in flux, a certain type of youth affected by the waning economy and obsession with material goods. The representation of such excess culminates in her aptly named canvas, Bourgeois Landfill”.¬†

Gangloff’s¬†pitch-perfect, highly detailed portraits are not characters of individuals, but illustrations of an exact likeness and eternal stamps of a moment’s mood. Her confluence of seemingly disparate, pale yet over-saturated colors on the canvas reminds me of Maurice Denis of “Les Nabis”, while her matter-of-fact representation of sketching, sometimes sexual, bodies echoes Egon Schiele. Her color are so honest, that skin looks vaguely bruised, imperfections apparent in all their creased and jaundiced glory.

LET’S LIVE IN HOPE’S WORLD!

Hope Gangloff

Hope Gangloff Home Decor

ONE: 19c Napoleon III Chaise Lounge with Toile / TWO:  6 ft. Tall Four Seasons Flowers Screen from Oriental Furniture / THREE: In2Green Eco Fish Cotton Throw Blanket / FOUR Lamb Fur Wool Pillows, Set of 2, in Blue and Grey

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Hope Gangloff

ONE: A Plaid Lounge Chair by Paul McCobb / TWO: angelo:HOME Harlow Dusk Blue Floral Armchair / THREE: The sluggie wool rug in turquoise blue / FOUR: Short-Necked Galvanized Steel Watering Can

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Hope Gangloff Home Decor

ONE: Lasko 754200 Ceramic Space Heater with Adjustable Thermostat / TWO: BRESCIANI Ribbed Knee-Length Fine-Cotton Socks in Brown / THREE: AERIE Floral Loop Scarf in Princess Blue / FOUR: Mohawk Ziggidy Tangerine Rug / FIVE: Pierce Ottoman in Mist from Williams Sonoma Home

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Hope Gangloff

P.S. As if Gangloff weren’t already cool enough, her¬†father-in-law, Bruce Degen, is the original book illustrator for the¬†Magic School Bus¬†series.

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The Armory Show

Every March, like the migration of strange Monarch butterflies, artists, galleries, collectors, critics and curators from across the globe make New York their destination during Armory Arts Week. From March 7-10, 2013, stationed at the Chelsea Piers 92 & 94 overlooking the Hudson, a hangar’s worth of creativity bustles in the largest NYC art fair. The fair has changed locations since its inaugural 1913 debut – from the East Side to Chicago to the Cincinnati Art Museum to Amherst College – ultimately that its coming back to its roots. The piers at the Armory Show, now designated as Contemporary and Modern, are devoted to showcasing the most important, notorious, and emerging artworks of the 20th and 21st centuries.
Erica and Max

My friends Max and Erica enjoy a Pain au chocolat, muffin, Diet Coke and Coffee in the VIP Lounge fitted by Roche Bobois.

The Armory Show 2013The Armory Show 2013

The Hudson River on the West Side of the island was once central to to the city’s trade and transportation infrastructure. With the success of the auto¬†industry, American’s reliance on waterways diminished and all-but-halted. Businesses at the piers closed down and many structures were left to decay. The desolate, vacuous spaces could be dangerous territory but also offered temporary homes to various artist projects, the most illustrious, perhaps, being Gordon Matta-Clark‚Äôs iconic¬†Day‚Äôs End¬†on Pier 52 in 1974.

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Sams√łn Projects of Boston had a booth arrayed with bongs, Carl Sagan and retail price tag fastener, featuring the works of Todd Pavlisko.¬†

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Peter Liversidge, Ingelby Gallery London.

Peter Liversidge’s presented by Ingelby Gallery, London.¬†Etc, 2011, neon. ¬†Remember the seen from The King and I? Etcetera, Etcetera,¬†Etcetera!

The Armory Show 2013
The Armory Show 2013 Destined to be a new Penguin Classic: Love Kicked Me Down (Where I Belong) by Harland Miller. 

The Armory Show 2013

The ‚ÄúDay‚Äôs End‚ÄĚ Champagne Bar at the Armory Show Contemporary section. Little did you know that this Pommery Champagne bar is steeped in art history. The special light-bulb sculpture Day‚Äôs End, 2013, is site-specific installation by Peter Liversidge that references an eponymous work by Gordon Matta-Clarke on pier 52 from 1974-75; and Marcel Duchamp & Ulf Linde ‚Äď Posterity Will Have a Word to Say, a special tribute to the 100th anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show, curated by Jan √Öman. Drink up.

Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz

Cary Leibowitz’s ¬†installation from Invisible Exports was a little too on-the-nose with its pessimistic yet honest take on pie charts, cliches and children’s rhymes.

Kevin-Harman_ForeverKevin Harman, Forever, 2012, mirror, carved oak frames, padlock 137 x 88 x 26 cm. INGLEBY GALLERY.

James-Hugonin-Binary-Rhythm-III-2011James Hugging, Binary Rhythm (III), 2012, oil and wax on wood, 189.5 x 169 cm.  INGLEBY GALLERY.

The Armory Show 2013

Brian Calvin,¬†Can With A Landscape (Robin), 2009. ¬†The otherworldly, martian quality of the artist’s portraits is ominous.¬†Alex Katz’s influence on Calvin seems obviously delightful.

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