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Mixology (22)

Painting:  The Corn Poppy, 1919, Oil Painting by Kees van Dongen. Check out those stunning red hat and black eyes! Kees van Dongen, was a Dutch painter and one of the Fauves. He gained a reputation for his sensuous, at times garish, colorful portraits. In 1897, Van Dongen arrived in Paris where he would share a studio with the famous Picasso. / Rug: Just Poppy in Doormat by ModCloth. There’s nothing more inviting than a bouquet of fresh flowers in your foyer! Now you can cultivate the same charming feel on your porch by welcoming guests with this poppy-covered doormat. Crafted from natural coir fiber with a convenient non-slip backing, this fresh addition to your decor features a hand-screened floral pattern in sweet shades of cranberry, persimmon, and clementine.

Painting: Travelers by Tatsuro Kiuchi from 20×200.com.  Kiuchi was born in Tokyo, Japan, in 1966 and began his art career as a children’s book illustrator.  Kiuchi has been commissioned by such clients as Royal Mail, to do the Christmas Stamp Collection in 2006, and Starbucks, for the Worldwide Holiday Promotion “Pass the Cheer” in 2007. / Rug: InterDesign Abstract Rug- Aqua/White from Target. Lines, the color of pools treated with chlorine, ripple across this tufted rug and give a modern and geometric edge to your space. The contract between the intermingled spiderwebs of the robin’s egg hue and the white is a gentle yet stark.

Painting:  Beat Bop by Jean-Michel Basquiat. A dark black canvas featuring graffiti influenced and rough sketches of bones, what appears to be a crown, an explosion (and within it, the word “bang!” in capital letters), and Roman numerals. Basquiat got his start in SAMO, a graffiti collective in Manhattan’s early-’80s downtown scene, and became a notorious painter before his death at 27. Rammellzee and K-Rob, American rappers originally released their hiphop single Beat Bop in 1983 on the record label Tartown with cover artwork commissioned to the artist. / Rug: Abyss & Habidecor Rug, Script from Bloomingdales. A bold, modern design in striking black and white, crafted in plush, super soft cotton. The scribbles are irreverent and uneven, paralleling the chaos of a Basquiat painting.

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Mixology (18)

Tray: A Personalized Melamine Square Serving Tray with Chevron Pattern and a Personalized Acrylic Square Serving Tray from LoveyDoveyCreations on Etsy, here. In your dressing room, would you put your nail polish, keepsakes, perfume, and rings on this lovely square?  / Room: Welcome to an absurdly glamourous dressing space. Benjamin Moore Feather Grey walls, a chandelier from Overstock, a vanity table from Pier 1 Import, the classic Louis chair, Chevron Rug from RugsUSA, and shelving from Target. Mai K from A Cup of Mai sure knows how to impress on a budget! Image found here.

Tray: Win your Poker hand every time with this Playing Card Tray by JOHN DERIAN COMPANY, INC. The glass decoupage tray features an ace playing card, hand painted bottom and is signed by the designer. The tray features a felted back to prevent slipping! Even the Queen of Hearts will want one! Purchase here. / Room: Kate Spade’s eclectic  living room tucked away on Manhattan’s Upper East Side is filled with high (Andy Warhols) and low (thrifted statues) end art mingling perfectly.  Photograph via Matchbook Magazine, everyone’s favorite field guide to a charmed life!

Tray:  Introducing the TuttiFrutti Tray! Swedish designer Maria Holmer Dahlgren designed this wonderful dishwasher-safe tray for happier weekdays and more while serving your favorite things. The happy colors and design will be sure to inspire and make you smile. The colorful, graphic contemporary tray is hand crafted from the highest quality Scandinavian birch from sustainable forests, and is produced by a family-run company situated on a small island off the southern Swedish mainland. Doesn’t this tray look straight from the Disney’s ride, “It’s a Small World”?  / Room: Found at Dust Jacket Attic, This whimsical midcentury room feels very cartoonish yet modern and serious. The wallpaper is clearly the lynchpin of the whole geometric scheme! Painted in colorful hues, basic shapes like triangles, squares and diamonds (maybe even polyhedrons!) bring a jolt of life to a modern room — and appeal to the pre-schooler in all of us. Photographs by chris warnes, styling by sarah ellison for real living au.

Tray: A salute to the grandeur of the Finnish capital Helsinki, this vibrant design by Per-Olof Nyström was created in 1952, one year after Marimekko made its design debut and bright, bold mark in the world of fashion. Revived in celebration of the city’s designation as the World Fashion Capital of 2012, this archival pattern intricately illustrates the Art Nouveau churches, boats and landmarks of Helsinki. Tray via Crate & Barrel, here. / Room: This cornflower, grey-blue room is a dreamscape of Scandinavian interior design simplicity, modern yet natural elements, photography and cloud colors. The gentle palette is welcoming, simple, honest and cozy. Styling by Kråkvid and D’Orazio via Pella Hedeby at Stil Inspiration. 

 

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The Soup (er) Bowl

In the Flatiron District of NYC, at East 19th and Broadway, lies a distinctly curated shop of kitchen delights. One will find a total hodgepodge of fiesta flatware, discarded cutlery, crossword puzzle plates, ice cream shop bowls, sherbet dishes, printed aprons, gouache portraits, grandma’s cake stands, olive holders, lemon squeezes, decorate muddlers, glassware that once belonged to congressional members, vintage wedding plate samples, canning jars, antique high tea sets, Alice in Wonderland teapots, some things are chipped, everything is mismatched and topsy-turvy, but there are some amazing finds to be had. There is even a special SALE section in the back with which they stock items from previously closed restaurants.  Some things are chipped, everything is mismatched and topsy-turvy, but there are some unique and beautiful finds to be had! Here is what the owner of the space says about Fishs Eddy’s genuine roots and peculiar charm:

It was 1986 and we were driving around the back roads upstate New York (code for lost). We stumbled upon a small hamlet called Fishs Eddy. It was a perfectly odd name so we borrowed it for our just-opened shop near Gramercy Park.

Those early days were new and exciting, driving aimlessly (code for no map) in our dented light blue pick-up looking for interesting finds. One fortuitous trip landed us in an old barn that was storing mountains of restaurant dishware from a near-by manufacturer. This barn had been in a fire and it was filled with plates, bowls, platters, cups and saucers, creamers and gravy boats. And remarkably, every single soot-covered dish was intact! We asked the owner of the barn (oh and yes, he was wearing overalls) if we could buy a few pieces and he said, “take it all!” And so we did. We hauled the “ware” back to our city apartment, scrubbed non-stop for days and discovered patterns and shapes that were absolutely beautiful and truly classic; a real slice of American history! We shared the same thought that we were on to something special… and customers agreed.

Twenty-five years later Fishs Eddy has made its own history. Millions of edgy, unique and incredibly fun dishes and glasses have come in and out of our doors. That old blue pick up truck is now a big delivery truck with our logo (and a GPS!) Of course we still meander and let life take us to unexpected places (code for can’t figure out how to work the GPS.) But most importantly, we’re still true to our original vision: commercial quality dish and glassware with plenty of other things to make people smile.

After all these years, we are still happiest doing dishes!


When I go to a restaurant that has a certain theme – whether it be Japanese, American Nouveau, Italian, Southern Style, French, Malaysian – the flatware and dinnerware speaks volumes about what type of food and which style restauranteur is running the space. In a Southern, down-home-cooking restaurant, the bowls are usually filled with mix and match, shabby-chic, charm. The colors are light and airy like cotton candy. In a Japanese restaurant, often the vibe is a bit darker with square plates, raku style ceramics, and earthen glazes. In a traditional French restaurant the menus are written on chalkboard signs, the tablecloths are white, and the lighting has a dim-light, dome-like glow. This decor plays on obvious stereotypes of cultural influences, and historical nods to the food, decor, and style of a certain time, place, or location.

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