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Tour de Brooklyn

Just as the Tour de France stops in many locations, so too, will this post feature a tour of many rooms I adore in various neighborhoods of Brooklyn!

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

Neon pillows, shag shams, clean white sheets, rustic wooden armoire, photographs leaning  and a paper lantern give this guest room a minimal, zen feeling. One could easily meditate on the wooden floors.

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

The devil is in the details, they say. The small, meticulous accents here include Wooden Birds by artist Kristian Vedel, a Rubik’s cube, a framed, vintage ACE playing card, milk-ware ceramics and more.

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

Bibliophiles take heed – even if your bookshelf isn’t towering and in need of a rolling ladder, use one anyway! And let a Maneki-neko (lucky, waving Cat) protect it all.

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

A decidedly mid-century modern lounge area is accented by a jute rug, mismatched but tonal pillows and tons of wooden details.

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

A hanging, circular mirror serves as a focal point and does double duty by expanding the small space through illusion. 

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

 Chihuly style blown glass becomes a centerpiece when stack like fruits in a bowl. Someone’s guitar is both a decorative item and utilitarian gathering point when company is over that can play. Finally, the kid;s third grade art project looks deceptively like collected African masks

Brooklyn Brownstone Home Decor Tour

The fifties accents – from the Calder mobile, to the oblong table, from the record player, to the artichoke, beige colored lounge chair – let the room live in a fun, yet updated timewarp.

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Richard Diebenkorn – An Artist’s Dwelling (10)

Richard Clifford Diebenkorn Jr. was born on April 22, 1922 in Portland, Oregon. His birth helped to “Keep Portland Weird” as they say. His family moved to San Francisco, California, when he was two years old. He was a wunderkind and was continually drawing from the age of four onward. He worked in hippie-dippie, liberal and idealistic locales ranging from New York City, Woodstock, New York to Albuquerque, New Mexico, Urbana, Illinois and Berkeley, California. Diebenkorn served in the U.S. Marine Corps from 1943 until 1945 but was stationed in Virginia and Hawaii during those years. His “wartime” work was comprised of vaguely humorous, dark charcoal sketches. He used the time he had while stationed to tour important museum collections and to internalize favorite traits and styles of artists such as Hopper, Matisse, and Gorky.

Richard Diebenkorn in Studio

Via.

 Richard Diebenkorn in his studio by Manitoba Museum of Finds Art

Richard Diebenkorn in his studio by Manitoba Museum of Finds Art
Richard Diebenkorn Negatives or Polaroids
The many emotions, phases and figurative positioning of Richard Diebenkorn via Eye-Likey.

Once the war was over, he moved back West and came to define the California school of Abstract Expressionism of the early 1950s. The field of art was only just “invented” in the 1940’s, in New York City and was still a burgeoning field. Interestingly, for a modern artist, Diebenkorn embraced art’s academic institution, both as a student and teacher, holding numerous professorships all over the Midwest and West Coast. He even studied under the G.I. Bill.

In 2008, when the Obamas first were looking to update the storied White House art collection to include modern art and work by minorities and women, they approached The National Gallery of Art.  A large-scale painting by Diebenkorn titled “Berkeley No. 52” was in the mix.

A painting from Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park series.

A painting from Richard Diebenkorn’s Ocean Park series is in this neutral master suite. The interior designer, Douglas Durkin reinvented this San Francisco apartment and allowed it to be dictated by the art: “The interior design is about serving the collection.” Image via Architectural Digest.

Sheila Bridges in Elle DecorA Victorian townhouse  in New York City gets a museum worth update by Sheila Bridges. Artwork in the living room includes, from left, a photo by Mark Heithoff and prints by Richard Diebenkorn and Sonia Delaunay; the zebrawood cocktail table has a stainless-steel base.Image via Elle Decor.

Untitled work by Richard Diebenkorn. Photography by Scott Frances

Playing with architectural right angles, this many-rectangled room features an untitled work by Richard Diebenkorn. Photography by Scott Frances. Image via Architectural Digest.

Room & Board - Diebenkorn

Abstract artist Richard Diebenkorn’s work was an exploration of form, color and poetic metaphor. He combined landscape influence, aerial perspective, and a private, calligraphic language into a dynamic style that engages and excites the viewer. Framed Diebenkorn work “Ocean Park 116”, 1979 via Room & Board.

Ocean Park Series 23, Diebenkorn

Patsy Tarr in front of ‘Ocean Park Series 23’ by Richard Diebenkorn in the living room. The bronze coffee table is by Alberto Giacometti. I’ll take one of each please! Image via New York Social Diary.

Diebenkorn’s compositional strengths gather around distinct, sensually drawn lines. Many of his series feature overlapping, translucent and scraped colors and paint. A process that is discernible to both artist and viewer. Leaving one to wonder what exactly is underneath each layer. It’s hard to describe the artist’s breadth of work the artist created – they are both muted and bright, mechanical and organic, representational and abstract. Some are small, claustrophobic and intimate, others grid-like and huge, echoing with emotion. Regardless of style, his works are powerful investigations between the interaction of space, landscapes, color and light. All somehow yearning and lonely, hearkening on the confusion of a single atom in a large universe.

Richard Diebenkorn in his studio at Main Street and Ashland Avenue in Santa Monica, ca. 1970–71. Photo by Richard Grant. Courtesy of the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation and Richard Grant

Richard Diebenkorn in his studio at Main Street and Ashland Avenue in Santa Monica, ca. 1970–71. Photo by Richard Grant. Image from the Richard Diebenkorn Foundation and Richard Grant.

Diebenkorn c. 1980's

Diebenkorn c. 1980’s via Eye-Likey.

Diebenkorn by Lyon

Richard Diebenkorn  by Fred Lyon, 1958. Image via 1stdibs, here.

Richard Diebenkorn

The “Ocean Park” Series Via Lisa Call.

Over the years his palette changes: flesh tones and grays are replaced by kitten-tongue pinks and blues, and then by deeper and darker contrasts of yellow, poppy orange and grass green. “The idea is to get everything right—it’s not just color or form or space or line—it’s everything all at once.” —Richard Diebenkorn

How can you live inside the whitewashed, soft pastel, multifaceted, and transient world of Richard Diebenkorn? Take heed:

Diebenkorn_InteriorDesign

Shop by the Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

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Mixology (18)

Tray: A Personalized Melamine Square Serving Tray with Chevron Pattern and a Personalized Acrylic Square Serving Tray from LoveyDoveyCreations on Etsy, here. In your dressing room, would you put your nail polish, keepsakes, perfume, and rings on this lovely square?  / Room: Welcome to an absurdly glamourous dressing space. Benjamin Moore Feather Grey walls, a chandelier from Overstock, a vanity table from Pier 1 Import, the classic Louis chair, Chevron Rug from RugsUSA, and shelving from Target. Mai K from A Cup of Mai sure knows how to impress on a budget! Image found here.

Tray: Win your Poker hand every time with this Playing Card Tray by JOHN DERIAN COMPANY, INC. The glass decoupage tray features an ace playing card, hand painted bottom and is signed by the designer. The tray features a felted back to prevent slipping! Even the Queen of Hearts will want one! Purchase here. / Room: Kate Spade’s eclectic  living room tucked away on Manhattan’s Upper East Side is filled with high (Andy Warhols) and low (thrifted statues) end art mingling perfectly.  Photograph via Matchbook Magazine, everyone’s favorite field guide to a charmed life!

Tray:  Introducing the TuttiFrutti Tray! Swedish designer Maria Holmer Dahlgren designed this wonderful dishwasher-safe tray for happier weekdays and more while serving your favorite things. The happy colors and design will be sure to inspire and make you smile. The colorful, graphic contemporary tray is hand crafted from the highest quality Scandinavian birch from sustainable forests, and is produced by a family-run company situated on a small island off the southern Swedish mainland. Doesn’t this tray look straight from the Disney’s ride, “It’s a Small World”?  / Room: Found at Dust Jacket Attic, This whimsical midcentury room feels very cartoonish yet modern and serious. The wallpaper is clearly the lynchpin of the whole geometric scheme! Painted in colorful hues, basic shapes like triangles, squares and diamonds (maybe even polyhedrons!) bring a jolt of life to a modern room — and appeal to the pre-schooler in all of us. Photographs by chris warnes, styling by sarah ellison for real living au.

Tray: A salute to the grandeur of the Finnish capital Helsinki, this vibrant design by Per-Olof Nyström was created in 1952, one year after Marimekko made its design debut and bright, bold mark in the world of fashion. Revived in celebration of the city’s designation as the World Fashion Capital of 2012, this archival pattern intricately illustrates the Art Nouveau churches, boats and landmarks of Helsinki. Tray via Crate & Barrel, here. / Room: This cornflower, grey-blue room is a dreamscape of Scandinavian interior design simplicity, modern yet natural elements, photography and cloud colors. The gentle palette is welcoming, simple, honest and cozy. Styling by Kråkvid and D’Orazio via Pella Hedeby at Stil Inspiration.