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The Surrealist Life – Mixology (33)

My father-in-law is a great fan of Joan Miro. The Spanish Catalan artist was born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893. His canvases are filled with almost calligraphic strokes of color, reminiscent of folksy doodles. His surrealist and abstract forms are both modern and yet, somehow very ancient…almost like drawings found at the paleolithic Lascaux Caves in France.

Miro created a series of paintings known as peinture-poésie, these wild forms contained loosely brushed fields of tone, and were inspired by art’s relationship to language, particularly poetry. Very cognizant of color choice, he once wrote of the color blue, “ceci est la couleur de mes rêves” (this is the color of my dreams).

Surrealist Lifestyle Items by The Walkup inspired by Joan Miro

  1. Set of 3 Himmeli Air Plant Hangers by HRUSKAA
  2. Bau Pendant Lamp by Normann Copenhagen
  3. Teepee Triangle Ring by House of Harlow 1960
  4. Christophe Joubert Printed Tote by Marni
  5. Giant Graphic Dot Pleat Dress by SUNO
  6. Distortion Candle in Blue by Areaware
  7. New York Idiom Hinged Forever And Ever Bangle in Metropolis Green by Kate Spade
  8. Lithograph After Joan Miro (3E) from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.  A sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike manifestation’s of Miro’s Catalan pride.
  9. Scope Rug by CB2
  10. Artisan Mixer in Electric Blue by KITCHENAID
  11. Jumbo Spoon Rest by BIA Cordon Bleu
  12. Sonneman Quattro LED Task Lamp in Red/Yellow/Black from Gracious Home
  13. QUERELLE D’AMOUREUX lithograph by Joan MIRO from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.
  14. Red Press Coffee Maker in Red designed by Erik Magnussen by Stelton

For me an object is something living. This cigarette or this box of matches contains a secret life much more intense than that of certain human beings. — Joan Miro

If you’re looking to be inspired by other paintings, visit Invaluable to browse a huge selection of paintings and other artwork. Life can imitate art!

Other Surrealist Sundries:
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Pattern Play

Sorry for my absence! The past month of my life has been a whirlwind – a wedding and a honeymoon. Yipeeeee. I guess I’m a WIFE now? Weird… There will be pictures to come soon (the world holds its breathe), but for now, let’s talk about patterns.

Marni’s Pattern Play Has Been Lauded for Years: From Gingham to Floral to Dots and Beyond!

Patterns are all around us, and technically speaking, are not a “man-made” invention.  Natural patterns include spirals (like in seashells, or in the golden ratio), waves, ripples (in sand dunes from the wine), tilings, cracks, snowflakes, and those created by symmetries of rotation and reflection. Almost all natural patterns has some underlying mathematical structure; think about the Fibonacci sequence or fern leaf fractals.

Although not quite organic, textile patterns seem to have an innate way of capturing our five sense – and maybe most in the sixth sense – style. Some say the sixth sense is paranormal activity or telepathy….but that’s just a rumor.

Walkup Spacer Line

Doesn’t everything look better with some symmetry – maybe  a repeating line, circle or square. 

Gingham and other fun textile patterns!

Basic Blue: 1 // 2  |  Red Letter Day: 3 // 4 // 5  |  Yellow Fever: 6 // 7 // 8 // 9 

Walkup Spacer Line

P.S. Thanks to Pugly Pixel for their awesome Gingham patterns! 
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Brocade Arcade

It’s not just for grannies in southern florida anymore! When you hear the term “brocade,” you should no longer thing of gaudy, gauche, flowered couches adorned in plastic covers.

Marchesa Collection – Cassarro Fabrics

Francine Collection – Cassarro Fabrics

Brocade fabric or brocade patterns are known for being “rich” and “opulent” because of how labor intensive and time consuming (and thus expensive) the creation of styles can be.  These decorative shuttle-woven fabrics are usually made using colored silks ($$) and with or without  metallic (often gold and silver) threads. True brocade must be made and largely woven on a Jacquard loom. This allows the textile to take on the look of a complex tapestry or large woven quilt. Although many brocade fabrics look like tapestries and are advertised by fashion magazines, brands, and home decor catalogues as such, an actual brocade piece is hard to come by in this machine age.

Fall 2012 Louis Vuitton

Marni 2012, Balmain 2012, Marchesa 2012 – aka the Brocade Brigade – found here.

Balmain Fall 2012

Deacon’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection brought Victorian opulence with a modern twist while contrasting androgyny with all things feminine, here.

Dark, deep, secretive and sophisticated. Via.

Brocade is often associated with Italy and the high Renaissance, but the success of the fabric is also a testament to the expansion of the silk road. Cultures in China, India, Persia and the Far East would copy, replicate, or repeat Italian motifs throughout their manufacture. Italy would then “steal” from China, no one is really so sure as to when and how the techniques were created. To this day, in Guatemala, brocade is the most popular technique used to decorate fabric woven by Maya weavers on backstrap looms. Some societies used to only reserve the style for special occasions. However, brocade’s steeply fell out of fashion after the Victorian Era and hardly existed in the 1900’s. Perhaps the textile would make an appearance in a purse here or a brooch there, but overall it was not en vogue. In recent years, such as at in 2005 or Fall 2012 , high-end designers have toyed with brocade fabrics even for everyday wear.

Brocade Damask Turquoise /  Custom Option: Isolate  © DLM Studio

Kirsten Dunst as Marie Antionette falls apart, but looks good doing so. Image found here, original source unknown.

Brocade is most often associated with upholsteries, draperies and evening-wear, but can also be used in unconventional ways. By marrying obscure  and slow weft techniques with an assembly line society, reliant on mass production, a sharp contrast can be drawn.

Via.

DRYDEN VELVET by OSBORNE & LITTLE

Like living inside of a cream colored Faberge egg, here. 

Sea Cliff Home by Niche Interiors

Beauty escorted by apes and monkeys as pages, from Beauty and the Beast, 1896, found in the New York Public Library.

Neon Brocade via Houzz. 

Wes Gordon 2012 ONYX AND GOLD LEOPARD BROCADE
AND BLACK WOOL COCOON DRESS & FLARED LEOPARD-BROCADE PANTS

Florentine Damask and a bit of Brocade upholstery? Via the Royal Design Studio.

East Meets West via DecorPad.

This clutch bag by ASOS Collection has been crafted from a brocade fabric with metallic detailing. The brocade Flatforms, Flats, and Chelsea ankle boots are driving me wild – they are clever and quirky.  Brocade is not just for the rich anymore!

Here’s a bit of a nomenclature lesson. All weaves consist of warp threads which run down the length of fabric and weft threads (also known as woof threads) which pass over and under the warp threads. Damask and brocade are related patterned fabrics in that they both exploit the play of light falling on the weave structure. Damask and brocade are both made on a jacquard loom. Brocade is usually made with richer colors, several threads, and is not reversible – that is, the fabric, when turned over, will create a photo-negative like effect. When in doubt, pull a Scarlett O’Hara curtain dress!