My husband and I are in the midst of decorating our new house. We find ourselves being drawn to seemingly disparate styles. We love Victorian clutter, and yet we also love sleek minimalism. We like aspects of midcentury modern, and we even like some steampunk accents. We found ourselves at a loss on how to incorporate all of our favorite eras, and yet to remain contemporary and present.

Introducing a fellow Brooklyn, NY resident, Jason Miller! Jason is influential in breaking the rigidness of contemporary modernism and initiating the back-to-nature movement in design. Born and raised in Darien, Connecticut, Jason’s suburban upbringing heavily influenced his early, more conceptual pieces — duct-taped chairs and cracked vases, among them — and continues to inform the elegant, historically rich work that has become his signature.

His Superordinate Antler Collection (2003) could be called an artful collision between hunting lodge décor and high-end contemporary design. The whimsical antlers are available in white ceramic, chrome and gold finishes. 

The_Walk_Up_Post_Meta_Tag-300x34A perfect mingling of organic masculine energy and quiet austerity, paying homage to  the fauna without harm.

Available for purchase at Jason’s own Roll & Hill, Design Within Reach or Future Perfect.  It’s “nature made better!”

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David Weeks Studio

David Weeks Studio / The Walkup

David Weeks is an American designer known for lighting, furniture, and household products. He has created capsule collections for Areaware, Kikkerland and Ralph Pucci International. His unique, geometric, modular and cone shaped chandeliers can be found in such famous places as Kate Spade boutiques, Barney’s New York, The Juilliard School, Saks Fifth Avenue, The MGM Grand Las Vegas  and in the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Weeks is the recipient of several design awards, a graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design, and a proud Brooklynite.

You have probably passed a David Weeks lighting fixture, desk lamp or lounge chair over a dozen times without even realizing it. His designs are unobtrusive and functional yet, upon further glance extremely delicate and whimsical.

Boerum Hill, Brooklyn

A custom David Weeks Torroja chandelier with black Bottle shades hangs in the dining area of a Boerum Hill, Brooklyn townhouse. Featured in Dwell magazine, February 2013 via David Weeks Studio Blog.

Loft Space

High ceilings and an open concept loft space on Fifth Avenue allow this office space with a large marble-top table modern, yet inviting. The chairs are by Paul McCobb and the hanging chandelier is by David Weeks, available at Ralph Pucci). The rug was made in Turkey from Angora-goat hair and seems ready for toes to sink into. Courtesy of Madeline Weinrib via New York Magazine.

West Village Townhouse, Renovation

In Julianne Moore’s remodeled, West Village brownstone, a floor lamp by Brooklyn designer David Weeks illuminates a corner of the wood-centric dining area via Remodelista. The wood-beamed ceiling and high archways only add to this rustic, city meets country vibe.

High Ceilings

In the dining and living areas of a duplex loft, chandeliers by Lindsey Adelman and David Weeks accent the art collection, which includes pieces by Keith Haring, Damien Hirst, and Andy Warhol. Images of the airy Manhattan loft, with enviable views, via Interior Design.

Suite NY Dining Room

Hans Wegner’s CH20 Chair is line the table in the formal dining room of an upper east side apartment.  A David Weeks light draws the eye in several diagonals and lights the space in a clever fashion. Interiors by Tori Golub Interior Design. Photography by Aaron Fedor via Suite NY.

High Ceilings

Raw wood, bare, black metal lines are accentuated by a deep purple couch, and mobile-esque presentation of the Weeks chandelier. Image found at Daily Dream Decor via Aubrey Road.

Aspen House

Soft cream details, dark and glossy wood floors, an animal skin rug, a David Weeks fixture and bare timber ceiling beams combine to make this the perfect Aspen Mountain Retreat by Emily Summers Design Associates.

Elaine McHale, Home & Interiors

A very spartan home uses a David Weeks lighting design for its visual interest found via home & interiors.

Lost City Arts Chaise Lounge, Francesca Connolly's Brooklyn BrownstoneCo-founder of Remodelista, Francesca Connolly’s, Brooklyn Heights brownstone. The owner explains “I have this chaise in my bedroom covered in pale blue velvet. It’s a reproduction that Lost City Arts makes. Perfectly proportioned; lean and sleek, and surprisingly comfortable. A great spot for kids that have wondered in in the middle of the night.” See more of Francesca’s sophisticated home, featured in a past issue of Elle Decor.

Provide Home

Bedside table by Christian Woo, art work by Joshua Van Dyke, lamp by David Weeks Studio (looking strangely like an alien lifeform) via Provide Home‘s Flickr.

David Weeks Studio / The Walkup

I am undecided whether the chandelier or the view is the best part. Both are pretty spectacular.

David Weeks Studio / The WalkupA happy, mod and sixties vibe: oranges, yellows, creams and high gloss accents make this oblong living space. Do you pick up the candy or the coffee-table book first?

Boi Sconce

A David Weeks Studio Boi Sconce graces a room by Magdalena Keck Interior Design, NY. Photographed by Jeff Cate.

Weak at the knees for Weeks!