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Mixology (25)

I spend a lot of time preparing. I think a lot about what I want to do. I have prep books, little notebooks in which I write everything down before a sitting. Otherwise I would forget my ideas. – Helmut Newton

This Notebook That Room

Room: Botanical illustrations made from reproductions circa the 1700’s on the wallpaper at the Carolus Linnaeus Swedish estate.  The spectacularly beautiful Swedish countryside, characterized by sweeping coastline, sheltering forest, and historic townships, is the setting for the equally spectacular tradition of residences, Swedish residences. Photographs by Ingalill Snitt via The Swedish House. / Notebook: The Medium Strawberry Thief fabric notebook from the Liberty London collection features a print fabric cover, yellow elastic fastening and ruled ivory pages with Liberty logo footers via Liberty London.

This Notebook That Room2

Room: A mod, mod living room with black & white wallpaper, West Elm Hive Vases, a glossy white lacquer low cabinet, a white Parsons end tables and yellow & gray rug ala Josef Albers geometry. Images from Haus Interiors.  / Notebook: A black and white notebook created by Lanvin featuring an original Alber Elbaz print at the front and back cover. The book includes 88 pages, from FarFetch, L’Eclaireur, Paris, France.

This Notebook That Room

Room: A splash of Scandinavian decor under the eaves proves to be a zen space for a study. A book’s spine provides pops of color, the file cabinet keeps the space bright, and the stool can fit an unexpected friend. Clean, simple and modern. Photography by Espen Grønli via Design Milk. / Notebook: The paper nuts at Postalco produce a rainbow of nifty notebooks! Based in Japan but hailing from Brooklyn, the stationery experts provide unlimited ways to tote your notes and store your sketches! Made with A7 metal springs, graph paper and a printed cover. Note that all pads are assorted, at random, and specific colorways cannot be chosen via Opening Ceremony.

So much is kept in a little notebook…

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Fort Greene

Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn that is on the National Register of Historic Places and is also a New York City-designated Historic District. The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island. Poet Walt Whitman, who was influential in the creation of Fort Greene Park in 1843. The viscinity contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also known for its many shout outs and mentions in songs and lyrics by RZA, Talib Kweli, Mos Def, Notorious BIG, Raekwon, Fabolous. Artistic types from all walks graviate to the cool community, check out past notable residents HERE.

Let’s take a sneak into the secret world of a quirky yet classic brownstone townhouse!

The Walkup

The Walkup

The Walkup

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The WalkupAn American flag, corduroy couch, cow-skin rug rug, marble fireplace, dark credenza, thrifted gold frame and wooden crate coffee table all intermingle easily thanks to the calming white walls.
Cumberland Street Marble Fireplace

Cumberland Street Living Room

Cumberland Street Living Room

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

A vintage Canon TL (released in 1968) in front of vintage mod photographs? How meta!Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Vaguely color coordinated books help to keep this cluttered bookshelf from looking messy.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Small details, such as an asian inspired jewelry box, tone down the cabin-style deer head mount. Who needs to hang prints when they can just as easily be leaned against a wall?

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Postcards are not just for sending, use each one collected as a mini print, art-piece and relic.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The butcher, baker and candlestick maker would all get along on this dresser because of the varied accouterments.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Teach your children well.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Wax, rusted iron, bowling pins, tackle boxes, bird cages, house plants, exposed brick and Aztec printed doggy beds, oh my! A kitchen straight out of an “I SPY” book definitely feels eclectic yet comfortable.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene
Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Pez dispensers are candy, candy is a food, so they belong on the kitchen, right?

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Essential oils and vintage Erlenmeyer Flasks and clamps elevate a space from a monotonous ecru room to a cool chemistry vibe.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The historic townhouse pays homage to its vintage past with small knickknacks, antiques and first editions.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene
Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Collect and display! Embrace disparate flea market finds and unite each by time period, color, style or any defining characteristic to give your house a unified but assorted sensation. Above all, surround yourself with things you love.

K.V.

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Brocade Arcade

It’s not just for grannies in southern florida anymore! When you hear the term “brocade,” you should no longer thing of gaudy, gauche, flowered couches adorned in plastic covers.

Marchesa Collection – Cassarro Fabrics

Francine Collection – Cassarro Fabrics

Brocade fabric or brocade patterns are known for being “rich” and “opulent” because of how labor intensive and time consuming (and thus expensive) the creation of styles can be.  These decorative shuttle-woven fabrics are usually made using colored silks ($$) and with or without  metallic (often gold and silver) threads. True brocade must be made and largely woven on a Jacquard loom. This allows the textile to take on the look of a complex tapestry or large woven quilt. Although many brocade fabrics look like tapestries and are advertised by fashion magazines, brands, and home decor catalogues as such, an actual brocade piece is hard to come by in this machine age.

Fall 2012 Louis Vuitton

Marni 2012, Balmain 2012, Marchesa 2012 – aka the Brocade Brigade – found here.

Balmain Fall 2012

Deacon’s Autumn/Winter 2012 collection brought Victorian opulence with a modern twist while contrasting androgyny with all things feminine, here.

Dark, deep, secretive and sophisticated. Via.

Brocade is often associated with Italy and the high Renaissance, but the success of the fabric is also a testament to the expansion of the silk road. Cultures in China, India, Persia and the Far East would copy, replicate, or repeat Italian motifs throughout their manufacture. Italy would then “steal” from China, no one is really so sure as to when and how the techniques were created. To this day, in Guatemala, brocade is the most popular technique used to decorate fabric woven by Maya weavers on backstrap looms. Some societies used to only reserve the style for special occasions. However, brocade’s steeply fell out of fashion after the Victorian Era and hardly existed in the 1900’s. Perhaps the textile would make an appearance in a purse here or a brooch there, but overall it was not en vogue. In recent years, such as at in 2005 or Fall 2012 , high-end designers have toyed with brocade fabrics even for everyday wear.

Brocade Damask Turquoise /  Custom Option: Isolate  © DLM Studio

Kirsten Dunst as Marie Antionette falls apart, but looks good doing so. Image found here, original source unknown.

Brocade is most often associated with upholsteries, draperies and evening-wear, but can also be used in unconventional ways. By marrying obscure  and slow weft techniques with an assembly line society, reliant on mass production, a sharp contrast can be drawn.

Via.

DRYDEN VELVET by OSBORNE & LITTLE

Like living inside of a cream colored Faberge egg, here. 

Sea Cliff Home by Niche Interiors

Beauty escorted by apes and monkeys as pages, from Beauty and the Beast, 1896, found in the New York Public Library.

Neon Brocade via Houzz. 

Wes Gordon 2012 ONYX AND GOLD LEOPARD BROCADE
AND BLACK WOOL COCOON DRESS & FLARED LEOPARD-BROCADE PANTS

Florentine Damask and a bit of Brocade upholstery? Via the Royal Design Studio.

East Meets West via DecorPad.

This clutch bag by ASOS Collection has been crafted from a brocade fabric with metallic detailing. The brocade Flatforms, Flats, and Chelsea ankle boots are driving me wild – they are clever and quirky.  Brocade is not just for the rich anymore!

Here’s a bit of a nomenclature lesson. All weaves consist of warp threads which run down the length of fabric and weft threads (also known as woof threads) which pass over and under the warp threads. Damask and brocade are related patterned fabrics in that they both exploit the play of light falling on the weave structure. Damask and brocade are both made on a jacquard loom. Brocade is usually made with richer colors, several threads, and is not reversible – that is, the fabric, when turned over, will create a photo-negative like effect. When in doubt, pull a Scarlett O’Hara curtain dress!