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Fort Greene

Fort Greene is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Brooklyn that is on the National Register of Historic Places and is also a New York City-designated Historic District. The neighborhood is named after an American Revolutionary War era fort that was built in 1776 under the supervision of General Nathanael Greene of Rhode Island. Poet Walt Whitman, who was influential in the creation of Fort Greene Park in 1843. The viscinity contains many examples of mid-19th century Italianate and Eastlake architecture, most of which is well preserved. It is known for its many tree-lined streets and elegant low-rise housing. Fort Greene is also known for its many shout outs and mentions in songs and lyrics by RZA, Talib Kweli, Mos Def, Notorious BIG, Raekwon, Fabolous. Artistic types from all walks graviate to the cool community, check out past notable residents HERE.

Let’s take a sneak into the secret world of a quirky yet classic brownstone townhouse!

The Walkup

The Walkup

The Walkup

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The WalkupAn American flag, corduroy couch, cow-skin rug rug, marble fireplace, dark credenza, thrifted gold frame and wooden crate coffee table all intermingle easily thanks to the calming white walls.
Cumberland Street Marble Fireplace

Cumberland Street Living Room

Cumberland Street Living Room

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

A vintage Canon TL (released in 1968) in front of vintage mod photographs? How meta!Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Vaguely color coordinated books help to keep this cluttered bookshelf from looking messy.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Small details, such as an asian inspired jewelry box, tone down the cabin-style deer head mount. Who needs to hang prints when they can just as easily be leaned against a wall?

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Postcards are not just for sending, use each one collected as a mini print, art-piece and relic.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The butcher, baker and candlestick maker would all get along on this dresser because of the varied accouterments.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Teach your children well.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Wax, rusted iron, bowling pins, tackle boxes, bird cages, house plants, exposed brick and Aztec printed doggy beds, oh my! A kitchen straight out of an “I SPY” book definitely feels eclectic yet comfortable.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene
Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Pez dispensers are candy, candy is a food, so they belong on the kitchen, right?

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Essential oils and vintage Erlenmeyer Flasks and clamps elevate a space from a monotonous ecru room to a cool chemistry vibe.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

The historic townhouse pays homage to its vintage past with small knickknacks, antiques and first editions.

Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene
Cumberland Street Classic Townhouse in Historic Ft. Greene

Collect and display! Embrace disparate flea market finds and unite each by time period, color, style or any defining characteristic to give your house a unified but assorted sensation. Above all, surround yourself with things you love.

K.V.

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A Moveable Feast

What do you get when you cross Williamsburg, Brooklyn with a veritable cornucopia and smörgåsbord of food options? A Smorgaburg! Let’s break this down for a second, a smorgasbord is a type of meal served buffet-style with multiple dishes of various foods on a table, originating in Sweden. In English and also in Scandinavian languages, the word smörgåsbord refers loosely to any buffet with a variety of dishes.

Smorgasburg happens every Saturday, rain or shine.  Part of the Brooklyn Flea Market,  Smorgasburg brings together food entrepreneurs and established purveyors from New York City and across the region selling both packaged and prepared foods, fresh produce, and other food-related stands (kitchen utensils, housewares, etc.), for a total of approximately 100 vendors. I have gone to this market several times and it is still my favorite NYC STAY-CATION. In my (very) humble opinion, the best foods hail from:

1. Asia Dog:   Asiadogs are hot dogs with Asian-inspired toppings incorporating flavors found in China, Korea, Vietnam, Japan, and more. Try the WangDing: Chinese BBQ Porkbelly + onions or the Vinh: Vietnamese banh-mi style: aioli + pate + cucumbers + pickled carrot and daikon + cilantro + jalapeno.

2. Bon Chovie: This is what happens when a chick with a metal head and a green thumb moves fromSeattle to Williamsburg andmarries a charter boat captain and all-around seafood maniac from Florida’s gulf Coast. If you know what’s good for you, have the fried anchovies “jersey style” (head’s on) and relish in the smoked paprika mayo and pickled sweet peppers on the side. Finally, if your thirst need quenching, they have a non-alcoholic sangria that has more fruit than a Chiquita banana headdress.

3. Brooklyn Soda Works: An artist and a chemist making soda and carbonated juices from scratch, using fresh and seasonal ingredients. If Willy Wonky had a soda factory and a seltzer bottle, he would be making these drinks. Using foraged ingredients like sassafras, knotweed, shiso, fennel and peppercorn, soda works makes the freshest (never from syrups or concentrates) and most refreshing fizzy lifting drinks. I want to use EVERY one of them in cocktails as mixers. Your best best will be the ‘grapefruit, jalapeno & honey’ pop.

Via.

4. Schnitz: Schnitz is the Shit(z). It is a quick-serve food business dedicated to serving your favorite comfort food: Schnitzel! For those who didn’t get the memo, schnitzel is thin, breaded and lightly fried pieces chicken, pork or veal. All sandwiches are served on a pretzel bun, your options include Sweet Onion: panko crusted crumbs + jicama radish pickle + beet tzatziki or Bamberg: panko parsley crumbs + cuco-daikon pickle + caramelized opinion mustard. My grandmother made schnitzel like it was her job, mostly because she was a stay at home mother and this was her “job”, to cook schnitzel. She was from the Polish shtetl and knew good schnitzel, this stuff comes close.

Via.

Via. 

5. The Good Batch: This purveyor of ice cream sandwhiches began with a simple mission:  bake pure, not overly sweet, delicious food. Anna Gordon, the founder and pastry chef of The Good Batch, has a lot of Dutch people in her life, and after years of receiving eager requests for making fresh stroopwafels, she finally did it. I must admit, the classic Goodwich style ice cream sandwich featuring vanilla ice cream and an irresistible oat cookie loaded with Belgian milk and dark chocolate chunks, and topped with sea salt was the PERFECT combination of salty and sweet.

Via.

Via.

Honorable Mentions: We Rub You, Mighty Quinn’s 

And then we took the East River Ferry home back to the isle of Manhattan and lived happily ever after…

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J’Door / J’Dore

“Follow your bliss and the universe will open doors where there were only walls.” – Joseph Campbell

Wendy Valliere, an interior designer, bedecks her Stowe, Vermont 1842 farmhouse in bold colors, eclectic tribal trappings and blue, Parisian antique doors! Via.

Two above, commissions for an Amsterdam residential project by Piet Hein Eek. NLD, The Netherlands, Amsterdam, apartment building De Borneohof, architecture of the refurbishment by Peter Gesebroek, installation by Piet Hein Eek. Staircase photography by (c) Thomas Mayer, for further images, click here. A space in Brooklyn, NY that feels like an urban yet suburban retreat. The neutral earth tones and whitewashed color palettes are calming! Owners Fitzhugh and Lyndsay of The Brooklyn Home Company searched ebay for weeks for a barn door to lead into the bathroom, and ended up finding one in the sheep run of Fitzhugh’s family’s farm in NH. Isn’t that how it always goes? The thing you are searching for was under your nose all along! Image via Design*Sponge and photography by Emily Gilbert.

This symmetrical and sherbet colored doorway is made of sunshine, cheerfulness and laughter. Seriously, could you be depressed with this as your welcoming color scheme? Image via Better Homes & Gardens.

A queen-size bed frame can easily set you back $2,000.  This one cost about $25.  More about this salvaged door DIY headboard via Country Living.

A little bit of mod podge and vintage wallpaper make this door decoupage a breeze! This English countryside decor is a little bit grandma and a little bit Elizabeth Bennet, but a lot of bit comfortable and quaint. Image found here, cannot find the original source.

The glamour of a grand palace ballroom meets the comfort and “Norman Rockwell familial vibe” of a farmhouse. Via.

Clean, sharp, linear and modern. Image via likainen parketti, found by Camille Styles.

Hello Ketchup and Mustard colored foyer, via Marie Claire Maison! 

Did Alice open this lime striped door in the rabbit hole to Wonderland? Via Coastal Living. 

Jenny from Little Green Notebook mixes flea market finds, and oriental inspired patterns and shapes, with new purchases! Her home is a theme park for the eyes with all lines leading to the lemon drop colored door! Via.

Domino Magazine, March 2009. High Gloss Black doors add some gothic glamour! Via.

 

The use of salvaged brick and antique doors give this entry foyer a unique feel that is not easily labeled. The interior designers of the Stamford house were asked to straddles the worlds of both traditional and modern design. Style title: Ektachrome. Image via Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects.

Home of Tamar Schechner of Nest Decorating featuring a painting by Nora Frenkel.

Poetry is the opening and closing of a door, leaving those who look through to guess about what is seen during the moment. – Carl Sandburg