0 comment

Silver Screen Scenes (2)

I remember my first love. It was a summer in the 1960’s. I was on holiday. We met in the Catskills. He was a tough, misunderstood, ne’er-do-well dance instructor with great hair. I was a naive, privileged, daddy’s girl who wanted to take a walk on the wild side. Wait, Wait, Wait, that wasn’t me.  That was Frances ‘Baby’ Houseman (Jennifer Grey) and Johnny Castle (Patrick Swayze) in Dirty Dancing. I have watched this movie an uncountable and incalculable number of times – case in point – I used to have “CRAZY FOR SWAYZE” sleepover nights with girlfriends.

Keep Calm and Carry a Watermelon (Screencaps Here).

Dirty Dancing is meant to capture a time in American history before families vacationed at Disney World or took International Cruises, before people were heading to the Bahamas or Cancun, families wholesomely vacationed in New York’s Catskill Mountains. From the 1920’s until the 1960’s, families often traveled to now mostly defunct summer camps – colloquially termed “Jewish Alps” or the “Borscht Belt”. The movie is scripted to take place during the decline of these camps and the onslaught of commercial airline travel. Well-known resorts of the area included Brickman’s, Brown’s, The Concord, Friar Tuck Inn, Gibber’s, Gilbert’s, Grossinger’s, Granit, the Heiden Hotel, Irvington, Kutsher’s Hotel and Country Club, the Nevele, The Laurels Hotel and Country Club, and The Pines Resort.

c. 1940s postcard of the Pine Tree Villa, a primarily Jewish resort at Kiamesha Lake, New York in the Borscht Belt of the Catskill Mountains!  Finely detailed image, showing layout of many of the resort’s buildings, including the casino and tennis courts to the left.  Was run by Greenberg & Son. The unused postcard can be purchased HERE.

GROSSINGER’S: The resort’s huge pool in the 1950s (Here).

The indoor and outdoor pool at GROSSINGER’S, dilapidated and in disrepair as of 2008 (Here).

My mom remembers a time when she used to visit these summer camps! She told me that such comedic legends at Woody Allen, Don Rickles, Rodney Dangerfield, Carl Reiner, George Burns, Mel Brooks, Fanny Brice, Bea Arthur and Joan Rivers got their start at these hotel resorts. Amazing actresses and entertainers such as Carole King, Shari Lewis, Mel Torme, Barbara Streisand, and Joel Grey also performed yearly at the establishments. These establishments were also some of the only places wherein African American performers were allowed to frequent (before Civil Rights) and was referred to as “The Chitlin Circuit”. The Supremes, Duke Ellington, The Four Tops, Etta James, Cab Calloway, and Smokey Robinson are some of the famous acts who frequented east coast resort towns. Clearly the performance halls and boarding houses nestled in the counties of Upstate New York have had an everlasting effect on the landscape of entertainment. However, has anyone yearned for the decor of this time period?

0 comment

Panel Discussion

Avocado Stoves are probably my absolute favorite interior designing dinosaur left over from the 1970’s.  Close seconds include a fully wallpapered kitchen and orange formica countertops. Something about the aforementioned items will always feel trapped in a time warp. However, there has been an item from the seventies that is having an evolutionary  and fashionable resurgence – Wood Panelling.

(From Elmira Stove Works by Northstar.)

(Photo by Adrian on Flickr)

(This gaudy and match match interior was found in a 1971 Better Homes & Gardens via HERE.)

Panelling includes  any wall covering constructed from rigid or semi-rigid components. These are traditionally interlocking wood, but could be plastic or other materials. There are even specific names for the locking components: Tongue and Groove (which sounds like a great band name). In antiquity, wood panelling was first used to make cold stone walls more comfortable and inviting. The wood also served as insulation from the chilly castle walls or stone interiors. In more modern buildings, that did not need environmental insulations, the technique is mostly used for decoration – showing off ornate engraving, beveling, wainscoting (usually on oak), and as a way to show off contemporary artists of the day. The most intricate form of paneling is known as boiserie. As a note, and a fun future trivial pursuit or jeopardy answer, the word “wainscot” is from [wageschot, Dutch] and means the inner wooden covering of a wall (To wainscot [waegenschotten, Dutch], to line the walls with boards) – found here.

(Perhaps I should begin getting all of my fashion and interior design cues from – which has not been updated in years. This is an image from the set of Freaks and Geeks , meant to take place in 1980, Michigan.)

(Note the wainscoting – from the set of That 70’s Show, meant to the place in 1976-1979 ,Wisconsin. Found Here.)

OK, now let us hop into the DeLeorean and reach speeds of 88 Miles Per Hour so that we can travel to the year 2012 where panelling has actually been reinvented. (How do I spell “panelling?” or “paneling” because neither is being corrected by autocorrect!? Are both right!? Interrobang!?) Modern panels often feature unfinished, untreated wood for a sleek, clean, and light wall.

[Read more]