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Ciderfeast 2015

On the sunny banks of the East River, from the producers of Pig Island, the NYC Hot Sauce Expo and Brisket King (and Queen) of NYC, came Ciderfeast! The event featured select regional, national and European ciders from more than a dozen brewers pouring over 30 beverages. The sweet summer refreshments were also paired with tons of hot dogs and live folk music.

The alcoholic libation, made from the fermented juice of apples, is most popular in the United Kingdom, but has been having a bit of resurgence in the states! (I say resurgence because our founding father, John Adams, began his days with a draft of hard cider. A common habit among Colonial America.)

Everyone knows the old adage, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away.” While the factuality of this statement could stand some prodding, it is true that cider has some research-backed health ben­e­fits from its high level of antioxidants. So, perhaps I went to Ciderfeast for my health? How responsible.

The real reason I loved going to Ciderfeast (while pregnant and unable to sample the wares, nonetheless) is because my husband is gluten-intolerant. For those with a sen­si­tiv­ity to gluten, Hashimoto’s disease or celiac disease, cider is one of the most delicious drink options out there. From dry to sweet, sparkling to flat, most of the brews are wheat, barley and hops free!

We sampled:

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VOLTA NY

On a very wet day, on the almost frozen banks of the Hudson River, VOLTA NY held its seventh annual exhibition, and inaugural showing at Pier 90 in Hell’s Kitchen, New York City. The somber weather minimized the number of competing eyeballs for art and foot traffic on the exhibition paths. Selfishly, this helped me to connect on a very deep level with many of the galleries’ offerings.

VOLTA NY is a platform for challenging, often complementary — and sometimes competing — ideas about contemporary art. The show is related to The Armory, in that it happens simultaneously, however its focus is diffrent. Rather than a gallery exhibition focuses on its largest ticket names, or proliferating its booth with as many recognizable pieces as possible, the shows begs visitors to deeply focus. In short, the show is about organic discovery and solo projects.

Stopping for artsy snacks from Little Neck, Everyman Espresso and Er Baretto, and lots of desserts between the booths, the entire experience felt otherworldly because of the gloomy day and its disconnect with bright acrylic, neon lights and seemingly surreal visuals.

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Williamsburg Walkabout

In my six years in NYC, I have lived two in Harlem, three in Chelsea, and now one in South Brooklyn. Each neighborhood boasted a proximity to other neighborhoods that I could explore in my spare time. While in Harlem, I would often walk south to Morningside Heights, or east to Spanish Harlem. In Chelsea, I would go down to Meatpacking and through the West Village on a weekly basis. Now, in South Brooklyn, I find myself drawn to Red Hook, and Fort Greene. But, for the first time in my life I have direct access to the G Train, and with that comes North Williamsburg (and Southern Greenpoint).

Williamsburg, for me at least, was always the trendy cousin of Manhattan: great for clever outdoor markets, special (raw, vegan, fusion, truffle, buzzword) birthday dinners, spotting all-black-clad models / gallery girl rejects, counting tattoos, and sipping French press coffee. But honestly, I never thought of the neighborhood as an actual residence. It was more like a rowdy vacation home.

With ease of access only a few stops away, the seventies vinyl siding of North Williamsburg’s less than stellar architectural remnants is now only minutes away.

 Walkabout Hitlist:

“I come from nowhere Brooklyn, New York. Williamsburg, Brooklyn. These days Williamsburg is kind of a hip area, but when I grew up there, the taxi drivers wouldn’t even go over the bridge, it was so dangerous.” – Barry Manilow