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Mixology (24)

I have reached the point in the wedding planning process wherein I have begun to think about flowers. What makes a tea rose different from an heirloom rose? What plants are in bloom during the month of my wedding? There are a bevy of questions that, prior to a month ago, I probably would never have though about. Aside from a monthly stop to the bodega for a fresh flower or two, my stance on succulents, peonies, herbs and the like was not so clear. After a very extensive phone-call with my lovely florist, Jenah, from Xylem & Phloem, my passion for petals has been sparked. I love an eclectic, muted bouquet. I adore feeling as if I just stumbled into a Jurassic era fern field. I delight in an English Tea garden. Let’s delve into a floral inspired frenzy.
This Bouquet That Outfit

Eclectic Bouquet for a Blush Pink Outdoor Wedding via Ruffled by Jennifer Frost of Chive Events. Dusty greens of a succulent intermingle with soft pinks, and a spot of mustard yellow and orange.

Earrings / Blouse / Belt / Pants / Sandals

This Bouquet That Decor

My florist, Jenah Barry, approaches floral design in a simple, elegant and relaxed manner. Her first word was ‘flower’. As an artist, with an MFA, flowers have always been important in her life. She sources the freshest plants from local purveyors and small-scale gardens. Her creations are so abundant with detail, they are reminiscent of Renaissance still lifes. On such a canvas, blossoms could be considered symbols of the seasons, trade, religion, and of the five senses.

Porcelain Napkin Rings / Drawer Pull / Dairy Creamer / Square Pillow / Rectangle Pillow

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Tree: The iconic Joshua tree, the namesake of the California park, is actually a member of the lily family. Legend says that Mormon travelers named the tree after the biblical figure of Joshua. Image found HERE. / Room: Home of Maurizio Zucchi, from Ideat Magazine, June 2011. Image found HERE.

Tree: Lavender Twist Weeping Redbud (Cercis canadensis ‘Covey’). Image found HERE. / Room: Purple floral living room Oversized floral wallpaper can be teamed with simple, solid, and bold accents to create a balance. Mirror – Tesco Direct. Armchair – Sofa Workshop. Photograph by Dominic Blackmore. Image found HERE.

Tree: Meyer Lemon Tree (and recipes to use its fruits), found at Happelsauce, HERE. / Room: Amy Lau Design, Beach House Bridgehampton. An airy, midcentury, natural, citrusy, living room. Image found HERE.

 

Tree: ‘October Glory’ maple is a hybrid between the Red maple (Acer rubrum) and the Silver maple (Acer saccharinum). It is not as brittle as the silver maple, but has the rapid growth of the silver maple. Fall color rivals that of the red maple. The tree and image found via Lynn’s Garden in Arkansas, HERE.  / Room: Elegant Pre-war 2 bedroom apartment in boutique full service cooperative on a lovely tree-lined street.  170 East 78th Street #5F on Upper East Side, NYC. It can be yours for ONLY $1.25 million. Image found, HERE.

P.S. What are you doing for earth day this year? Any special traditions or recycling and water usage promises?

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Concrete Jungle

Concrete is a composite construction material composed primarily of aggregate, cement and water. Technically speaking, concrete is a heterogenous mixture that has several variations – it’s recipe can include sand, ash, pumice, silica, quicklime, pozzolanic ash, crushed limestone, and crushed granite (to name a few). The chemical process in which concrete solidifies and dries is actually (and ironically) called hydration. The substance and invention actually date from the Roman Empire – indeed the word comes from the Latin word “concretus” (meaning compact or condensed).  Apparently though, after the fall of the Roman Empire this technology became extremely scarce and all but forgotten until the 18th century – that’s thousands of years people!  HOW does something like that happen? The romans used the substance to shape domes, aqueducts, and archways. Several concrete bathhouses still stand from the era. That seems pretty advanced for the time period – and yet POOF! The discovery just disappears.

Via Knight Frank

In the town of Zwickau, Germany, concrete architecture peppers the rivers. Image found HERE. 

 LicenseCopyright All rights reserved by Ty Cole.

Brutalism was an architectural style that flourished in Critics of the style find in the 1950’s to the mid 1970’s. Many viewers found it unappealing due to its “cold” appearance, projecting an atmosphere of totalitarianism (this was the Cold War, folks). Others were upset that the material of concrete was used in residential areas as it lent itself easily to urban decay and graffiti.  Alison and Peter Smithson (British architects) coined the term in 1953, from the French béton brut, or “raw concrete”, a phrase used by Le Corbusier to describe the poured board-marked concrete with which he constructed many of his post-World War II buildings. To learn more about the styles origins, go HERE. 

Concrete is extremely susceptible to environmental damage. The mixes tensile strength can be damaged by wetness, sea water, freezing, and erosion. Today we have a bevy of materials that can hinder this process – however in the ancient days of yore – the Egyptians, and subsequently the Romans, learned to add horse-hair to the mixture in order to stop cracking.

A concrete wall becomes the new neutral. 

Reflective, glossy, air, and bright. Concrete becomes a minimal lover’s landscape. LicenseCopyright All rights reserved by Stebbi.

Concrete floors found in the Dutch Mountains, image via Design Milk HERE.

Brutal concrete stairs via Sisters Agency, HERE.

Sideboards by Eric Degenhardt for Böwer, image found HERE.

As far as being a decorative material, concrete actually can come in colors other than a drab grey! It all depends on the initial mix. Concrete even takes to staining, just like wood! The rock is also extremely energy efficient because it does not allow air seepage (like wooden house frames) – it can help to insulate and keep a building’s temperature constant.

A modern and white space complete with burnished and sleek concrete floors. The material takes on a natural and calming quality. Image found via House to Home, HERE.

This Spanish abode is 1/3 rustic cottage, 1/3 bohemian, 1/3 brutalist minimalism. Image found HERE.

Concrete loft in the West Village, NYC. Bricks, Concrete, Plastic, and Wood mingle in this airy space. Embrace materials. Found HERE. 

For the record, there is an abstractionist art movement called “concrete art”. It was first introduced by Theo van Doesburg in his “Manifesto of Concrete Art” (1930) – it has NOTHING to do with the rock mixture and EVERYTHING to do with casting off the strictures of interpretation. The art form aims to be devoid of symbolic influences or implications, in this way it is a concrete thought, not able to be read. Also affected by the varied uses of the word, “concretism”, is a practice of poetry wherein the visual arrangement of words form a pattern on the page are more importance than phonetic aesthetic. Oh the joys of the English language, etymology, and homonyms!

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