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Meet & Greet – Elisheva

Hook n’ Loop Design is a studio for modern and minimalist home-ware with just a dash of whimsy and a high-dose of functionality, making the items perfect for uncompromising trendsetters.  Elisheva Manekin, the founder and product designer for the studio, is inspired by living in a small space (her family caravan).

Hook N LoopDesign - Meet Elisheva Manekin

Her studio arose from the need for versatile design that does the job well and can then be stored flatly, easily and space-efficiently. Even though that “modern and minimal” usually means a lot of black and white, the studio appreciates pops of color.

Her designs are effortless, and can be mix and matched!

  • Name: Elisheva Manekin
  • Location: A small (70 families) community in a very rural part of Israel, in the south, called Shekef, about an hour from Tel Aviv.
  • Job: Industrial designer and owner of Hook n’ Loop Design
  • Age: 32

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Elisheva of Hook N Loop Design

EAT: There are no local restaurants nearby (although we do have a pizzeria) BUT because this is an agricultural area of mostly vineyards, there is a sort of truck stop. It belongs to my neighbor. Basically every morning he sets out to a nice opening in one of the fields by the main road with a small house shaped trailer attached to his truck. He makes the best Hummus ever! He also sells Shakshuka (an Israeli dish with eggs and tomato sauce that you scoop up with Pita) and Sabich (hardboiled eggs and eggplant with hummus in a Pita). Everything he makes is very fresh, often spicy and always delicious.

Elisheva of Hook N Loop Design

SEE: Because we live in a remote area, we do a lot of driving. My husband and I are originally from Jerusalem, so we visit our parents there a lot. The city recently renovated the train tracks that used to go through the city into a park (similar to The High Line in Chelsea, NY). We love to go there with our two children (5 year old boy /3 year old girl) and ride our bikes. At the end of the park they renovated the old station with cafes and a small organic market. They often have outdoor shows – it’s really lovely.

Elisheva of Hook N Loop Design

SHOP: I absolutely love bakeries! My favorite bakery would be one called Lechamim (לחמים means breads in Hebrew) – they make the best everything! I think they recently opened a branch in NYC – so you should definitely check it out.

Elisheva of Hook N Loop Design

DO: I have to say, what I honestly enjoy the most is watching TV. I catch all the shows from the USA online, and Project Runway is definitely a favorite. Magazines come next – anything design related – from Elle Décor UK to Domino to Marie Claire Maison.

Elisheva of Hook N Loop Design
INSPIRE: I love solving problems with design. Most of my ideas come from problems I have in my own life at home – mainly lack of space. I think about new products all of the time, and literally can’t sleep until I figure it out.
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Elisheva knows the feeling of finding something you love, and getting excited about having people over to show them your new purchase. She hopes you’ll find something to obsess over at Hook n’ Loop Design! Drop her line. 

Meet & Greet – Annabelle

Meet Annabelle of the decor website Stylish Furniture & Decor. Annabelle worked for 10 years as a residential Interior Designer in Washington, DC and New York City, NY. She was inspired to start her new online furniture business because of her love of sourcing and helping to supervise a client’s design process. She believes that a new purchase as simple as one chair can help a home to feel “completely furnished”. She explains, “There is no purchase or project too small – as every piece is an important component.” She describes her website’s offerings as “sleek, “trendy”, and “fashionable”. Her favorite decorative time period is the present (even though I would love to live in Versailles or the Greco-Roman Era, her answer makes much more sense…I do love indoor plumbing)! She explains that, her version of “modern design” means mixing pieces from different periods and having fun with unexpected design.

Annabelle is a fellow New Yorker who lives in the West Village (one of my personal favorite neighborhoods in the city). As part of the EAT/SEE/SHOP/DO series, I asked her to come up with a short list of her favorites –

EAT: Mole, a Mexican restaurant on 57 Jane St, at the corner of Hudson St. New York, NY 10014. The mole enchiladas are actually to die for.

Image courtesy of Mole, West Village, HERE.

SEE: The Hudson River Park is one her favorite things about living in the West Village, she adores being able to access the river walk. The area is the largest park to be built in Manhattan since the completion of Central Park. It is right along the water and boasts amazing skylines and sunsets. The park also includes tennis courts and skateparks!

Image found HERE.

SHOP: Chelsea Market, especially the produce market, The Lobster Place (fresh lobster, fishmongers, and shellfish on ice!), and Buon Italia. If you plan on picking up ingredients for a gourmet dinner, this is your one-stop shop.

Image courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.

DO: Sunday afternoon cocktails at any restaurant in the West Village or Chelsea! It’s always lively and fun! Bonus points for finding seats outside on a nice day for people watching.

Although Annabelle describes her home as simple and tailored meets cozy bachelor pad (her husband’s stuff), her website has a decidedly art deco, midcentury, anthropomorphic, and retro vibe. Here are my favorite finds from her site:

Shop by the Numbers: : 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8

If you love these items, Annabelle has agreed to give The Walkup readers a whopping 10% off all items from today until 5/31/2012, with the code WALKUP. Enjoy perusing!

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White Hot

Let’s get technical (sung to Olivia Newton John’s “Let’s Get Physical”) White is a color, although it is also an optical illusion. The color white is merely a perception which is evoked by light (the color white does not exist without light) that stimulates all three types of color sensitive cells in the human eye. These cells are actually all stimulated in nearly equal amount and with high brightness compared to the surroundings in order to produce the color white.  An object whose surface reflects back most of the light it receives (opaque) and does not alter its color will appear white. Most sources of light and incandescence also appear white. The etymology of the word “white” in most languages usually also means “bright”, “reflected”, and “light”. Clearly ancient civilizations understood the concept that the color white was similar to lightwaves way before science caught up.

When white appears in nature (such as clouds, and snow) the color is actually only water crystals reflecting back the light of the sun. Remember, even the moon at night (which often appears white) is reflecting back the color of the sun.

Rather than delve into the man-made connotations of the color (purity, chastity, holiness, weddings, mournings, et. al.), I think of white merely as an extension of the sun and life, and the light provided by stars. This is its natural state, devoid of context.

Image and furniture via Ikea. White furniture in a white living room can create an illusion of space.

Both of the above images are from the same home. And, technically speaking, if you were to view these white spaces against a dark backdrop, the brightness would be even more obvious!  White allows deeper hued objects (such as vases, books, and flowers) to pop at full potential. The contrast between the white and the tchotchkes allows each object to be put on a pedestal. It also allows each object to seem purposely chosen.  Image found HERE.

White does not have to be minimal! Stick to a color palette of three (burgundy, brown, and white) for a lush and deep feeling. Photo by Art Gray, New York Loft styled by White Webb.

A shabby chic inspired white room replete with reclaimed barn wood floors. Also, the varying materials in this room force the eye to look at all objects and all dimensions. Designer Darryl Carter transformed this blank space. Benjamin Moore’s “Simply White” is used throughout the apartment but to add the illusion of airiness, openness, and area. Image photographed by Gordon Beall and found HERE.

Amaridian, has teamed up with Cape Town’s Design Africa to showcase and promote excellence in African design. The images is from the showcase of African design in NYC, products by Mud Studio, Ronel Jordaan, Tekura Design and Diallo Design. White does not need to have stark geometric shapes, and uber clean lines. Here the color white is romantic, trivial, and subdued. Image found HERE. 

Did I mention how important windows (and thus light) is for white? The above loft has a very 1970’s design aesthetic! Image found HERE.

Ebony and Ivory! Black, Red, and White is a classic color scheme that is never wrong. Image found HERE.

I could actually see enjoying laundering in this space. I have never felt invited in by a laundry room, but here’s to firsts! I bet spotting stains in this environment is super easy. I also love the light, pine wood accents. Image found HERE.

Romantic, antique, luxe. Ivory, Cream, and White (keeping it in the color family). Achromatic works. Image found HERE.

Shabby, Romantic, Charming, Country style. Image found HERE.

I spy a Birkin Bag and a Saarinen Table and a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe designed Barcelona Chair. Image found HERE. 

Neutral paint colors: ‘Veil Cream’ by Benjamin Moore and a Le Corbusier chaise. Somehow this space is rustic, western, and natural. Photo by Justin Bernhaut, Domino, Dec. 2006. Domino Magazine.

  • “White…is not a mere absence of colour; it is a shining and affirmative thing, as fierce as red, as definite as black…God paints in many colours; but He never paints so gorgeously, I had almost said so gaudily, as when He paints in white.” — G. K. Chesterton
  • “The first of all single colors is white … We shall set down white for the representative of light, without which no color can be seen; yellow for the earth; green for water; blue for air; red for fire; and black for total darkness.” — Leonardo Da Vinci


Shop By The Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8/ 9