In slang terms, when something is “clutch,” it knows how to perform under pressure in those crucial moment that comes between winning and losing.

In fashion, a clutch is made to carry the essentials: lipstick, keys, a phone, and perhaps a few tampons. The bag is generally used at night, and meant to be held in one’s hand as easily as an envelope or small parcel.

Combining these terms, one can have a “clutch that is clutch”.

A Wheel of Clutches for your evening bag needs, featuring Kayu, Rebecca Minkoff, ASOS, Alice+Olivia, and more.

(From Top Right, Clockwise)

  • Imperial leather box clutch by Anya Hindmarch includes her signature cartoonish eyes that give this piece whimsy.
  • The Leo Clutch by Rebecca Minkoff features an exposed zipper trim.
  • Alice+Olivia’s Stripe Be Beaded clutch adds an elegant touch to any outfit.
  • A seriously cool clutch for all the heart melters out there by Minty Jungle. 
  • The ASOS Punchout clutch is created using laser-cut flap designs.
  • Partially Parisian, and very feminine, this Poodle print envelope is the ultimate quirky pattern from ASOS.
  • Edie Parker’s Jean Striped Acrylic and Glitter Clutch is inspired by midcentury styles worn by socialites and showgirls.
  • Matte leather, magnetic closure and beaded sequins intermingle in this geometric masterpiece by River Island. 
  • A hardshell Kayu clutch with embroidered stars on the woven exterior.

Hidden on an unassuming side-street on the border of Cobble Hill and Boerum Hill in Brooklyn, NY lies Aaron Ruff’s studio. Based out of the The Invisible Dog Art Center, Ruff’s jewelry line is asperous, craggy, whimsical and filled with motifs of yore: Latin phrases, ballinger vessels and other ships fueled by the trade winds, antique letterpress keys, anatomical parts seemingly drawn by Henry Gray, and other sundries. And yet, from the creation of rough-hewn objects comes some of the most unique and delicate engagement rings I have ever seen.

Meet Digby & Iona.  In addition to the jewelry, the studio is  packed floor to ceiling with antiques and curiousites fit for a Victorian cabinet.

And who are Digby & Iona? Well, no one…really. Ruff chose to name his company after two quiet seaside towns in Nova Scotia, Canada (inspired by a trip taken before the studio’s creation). The names just happen to also be a juxtaposition of two interesting and sophisticated people who sound vaguely literary.


Shifting his style a few years ago, Ruff now splits his focus between sterling silver creations, high-end gold stacking rings, and diamond engagement rings on commission. He sources his gems from a fellow NYC company that has an ethical mine in India. Ruff, who used to be a carpenter and cabinetmaker, has been interested in adornment since his teens. He loves to work with “the weird stuff,” such as black diamonds, “salt-n-pepper stones”, sapphires, and tourmaline. Lately, the work is becoming more geometric and architectural; literally building houses for his stones – a much more personal nomenclature than “prongs” or “settings.”

Not just for the gentler sex, Digby & Iona explores the intersection between masculine and feminine, chunky and dainty, antiquated and new. My colleague Meg and I tried on plenty of ultra thin bands alongside heavy signets (ala Henry VIII) with the idea that body decor is androgynous and personal.

Ruff is a transplant from Dresden, Maine. A town with a population of 1,672 people in a county that seems closer to Canada than the rest of the USA. This idea of obscurity pervades most of his pieces.


We continued speaking casually over the sound of a tumbler polishing pieces and Ruff’s dog whinnying at a bird outside. Extensive research is done over every piece, no matter how many millimeters of design. We explored items inspired by the War of 1812, J.R.R. Tolkien quotes, and essays by Teddy Roosevelt.

If you want jewelry that speaks to the past and is connected to human affairs and bygone quotes, Digby & Iona offers a veritable library of inspiration.

Like happening upon a shipwreck, spelunking for geodes, or unearthing buried treasure, or a map to a hidden cache, the details in Ruff’s studio and jewelry present themselves slowly but richly.

Adorn Yourself.


Leith Clark X Warby Parker

The second I received a preview of the Leith Clark collaboration with Warby Parker, I screamed, “Holy Sexy Libraryian, Batman!” You’ll recognize Leith Clark and her unmistakably feminine eye from Harper’s Bazaar U.K. and Italian Vogue, her styling of red carpet stunners, and from the pages of Lula magazine, which she founded.

Be Spectacular. BESPECTACLED! 

Leith Clark X Warby Parker

Photo by Hannah Thompson.

The collection was inspired by the 1960s, librarians, pearls, brass, opera glasses, violet,  nerdy girls. Leith wanted to recreate the glasses you had when you were a kid — or that your dad wore — the kind of glasses that were only relegated to childhood dress-up. Leigh also loves big, thick glasses on little, tiny faces. All five frames (Aurora, Greta, Marva, Wednesday and Willow) have a distinct shape and feature heaps of charm and whimsy.

Leith Clark X Warby Parker X The Walkup

As if these specimens weren’t cool enough, for every pair of glasses sold, a pair is distributed to someone in need. A percentage from each sale goes to Girl Up, a United Nations Foundation campaign mobilizing American girls to raise awareness and funds for UN programs that provide life-changing opportunities to girls around the world.

Keyholes, circular frames, slight cat-eyes, rimless lenses and more! 

Leith Clark X Warby Parker X The Walkup 2Photos of Zoe Kazan by Pamela Hanson.

Warby Parker - Leith Clark Collection