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Accessodium Giveaway

The weather in Brooklyn is officially in its winter phase. I know it’s only November but the windchill or the frost didn’t seem to get the memo. What better way to celebrate the changing of the seasons than with cozy knits? Accessodium’s creations make me want to sip cocoa by a fire.

Tanya was nice enough to offer this gorgeous handspun yarn, handknit cowl ($50) for one lucky reader of The Walkup. Ready to enter? Use the giveaway widget below.

Enter to win creations from Accessodium, An Etsy shop filled with wool, crocheted goods, and knits

None of the entry options are mandatory, so you may choose your favorite entry method, or use all entry methods for your best chance of winning. 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Accessodium was created by Tanya, who is originally from the Ukraine, but now living in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Tanya grew up watching her grandmother knit so naturally, it seemed magical to her.  As a child, she knew one day that she would able to make things as well as Granny!

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Accessodium’s shop holds knits, crocheted beanies, scarves, leg warmers, gloves, brooches, cowls, skirts, bookmarks and anything that can be dreamed up with imagination and wool.

Now, once a week Tanya visits a farm, where she learns about wool production, and other fibers such as alpaca and angora goat fibers. She can carde, dye and spin wool. Being able to use handmade yarn from homegrown animals is a lot of work.

For Tanya it’s hard to say which one is a hobby and which is work – yoga or Etsy. She loves do both!  Here are other things that make her tick:

    • EAT: I love sushi and Japanese food in general. So any good Japanese restaurant is my favorite place to eat.
    • SEE: I fell in love with Arizona. I have been there many times; I love how it smells and I love its beauty.
    • SHOP: I like Free People, even though I do not shop there too often, I visit the shop for inspiration.
    • DO: I like mountain hiking with my family or friends. For our last hike we went to Yosemite National Park.

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My husband and I are in the midst of decorating our new house. We find ourselves being drawn to seemingly disparate styles. We love Victorian clutter, and yet we also love sleek minimalism. We like aspects of midcentury modern, and we even like some steampunk accents. We found ourselves at a loss on how to incorporate all of our favorite eras, and yet to remain contemporary and present.

Introducing a fellow Brooklyn, NY resident, Jason Miller! Jason is influential in breaking the rigidness of contemporary modernism and initiating the back-to-nature movement in design. Born and raised in Darien, Connecticut, Jason’s suburban upbringing heavily influenced his early, more conceptual pieces — duct-taped chairs and cracked vases, among them — and continues to inform the elegant, historically rich work that has become his signature.

His Superordinate Antler Collection (2003) could be called an artful collision between hunting lodge décor and high-end contemporary design. The whimsical antlers are available in white ceramic, chrome and gold finishes. 

The_Walk_Up_Post_Meta_Tag-300x34A perfect mingling of organic masculine energy and quiet austerity, paying homage to  the fauna without harm.

Available for purchase at Jason’s own Roll & Hill, Design Within Reach or Future Perfect.  It’s “nature made better!”

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Record Time

Step 1: Find a friend! I found Kimberley, she’s my go-to crafting buddy. If you have a friend named Kimberley, use her too. Go to your local thrift shop and find cake molds, bowls, or anything circular that is oven safe over 300 Degrees Fahrenheit. Our bowls were only $1.99. This object will be used to mold your record bowl.

Step 2: Continue shopping at your local Goodwill, or thrift shop to find inexpensive records. Ours were $0.99 each, however many places sell classical albums for $0.25 a pop. Be warned! Sometimes the most AWESOME covers actually have the least attractive records inside. Don’t judge a book (or record) by it’s cover. The inside is what counts (in life, and in record shopping), so open the package and the sleeve and see what the record inside has to offer. This is what will be on display in the end product.

Step 3: Preheat your oven to 250-300 Degrees Fahrenheit. Wipe down your record so it does not have extraneous dust – this will melt into the bowl. Make sure the record is dry. Place your record centered on an oven proof bowl. Place in the oven for no more than five minutes (it starts to let off toxic gas if left in too long) at a time. Open a window and ventilate. At five minutes (but sometimes sooner, use oven light to check if corners are dropping, melting, and bending) take out of the oven using oven mitts! Safety first! Remain calm! Don’t fret!

Step 4: As soon as you take the record out of the oven (it will be hot) work quickly (less than 20-30 seconds) to shape the object. You can use the bowl as a mold, and press the record inside. You can also roll the record as you would when making a megaphone out of paper (lower left hand corner). If you are sculpturally inspired, you can even freehand mold the record into different shapes, or stamp the melted vinyl with pattern. If an object is not folding or forming to your liking, place it in the oven to soften it again for another minute or so. The vinyl cools and dries EXTREMELY quickly – usually in under a minute.

Step 5: Place and show off your object. Here I am planning on using the bowl to hold candy near my bar! Kimberley is using her rolled record (in the previous image) as a sconce or a plant holder mounted to the wall. These bowls can be used as planters because of the hole in the middle makes automatic drainage! Since the item is so inexpensive to make, and takes such a short amount of time to form (some would say RECORD TIME, har har), I would recommend making a ton of them and giving them away to people you love as “just because” presents! What a unique and retro way to decorate.

P.S. All photographs by me.