Article
0 comment

The Surrealist Life – Mixology (33)

My father-in-law is a great fan of Joan Miro. The Spanish Catalan artist was born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893. His canvases are filled with almost calligraphic strokes of color, reminiscent of folksy doodles. His surrealist and abstract forms are both modern and yet, somehow very ancient…almost like drawings found at the paleolithic Lascaux Caves in France.

Miro created a series of paintings known as peinture-poésie, these wild forms contained loosely brushed fields of tone, and were inspired by art’s relationship to language, particularly poetry. Very cognizant of color choice, he once wrote of the color blue, “ceci est la couleur de mes rêves” (this is the color of my dreams).

Surrealist Lifestyle Items by The Walkup inspired by Joan Miro

  1. Set of 3 Himmeli Air Plant Hangers by HRUSKAA
  2. Bau Pendant Lamp by Normann Copenhagen
  3. Teepee Triangle Ring by House of Harlow 1960
  4. Christophe Joubert Printed Tote by Marni
  5. Giant Graphic Dot Pleat Dress by SUNO
  6. Distortion Candle in Blue by Areaware
  7. New York Idiom Hinged Forever And Ever Bangle in Metropolis Green by Kate Spade
  8. Lithograph After Joan Miro (3E) from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.  A sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike manifestation’s of Miro’s Catalan pride.
  9. Scope Rug by CB2
  10. Artisan Mixer in Electric Blue by KITCHENAID
  11. Jumbo Spoon Rest by BIA Cordon Bleu
  12. Sonneman Quattro LED Task Lamp in Red/Yellow/Black from Gracious Home
  13. QUERELLE D’AMOUREUX lithograph by Joan MIRO from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.
  14. Red Press Coffee Maker in Red designed by Erik Magnussen by Stelton

For me an object is something living. This cigarette or this box of matches contains a secret life much more intense than that of certain human beings. — Joan Miro

If you’re looking to be inspired by other paintings, visit Invaluable to browse a huge selection of paintings and other artwork. Life can imitate art!

Other Surrealist Sundries:
Article
1 comment

Affordable Art Fair, New York

With a private viewing that began on April 2, the four-day event known as the Affordable Art Fair, hosts 78 galleries and a huge array of contemporary art at The Metropolitan Pavilion in Chelsea. On Thursday April 3, I called a gaggle of friends and joined a Thursday night party for young collectors. We browsed contemporary art while sipping cocktails by Slow & Low Rock and Rye.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Max and Suzy take in the sites, (top right) Lancaster Ballroom, The Savoy by Siobhan Doran, 2010, Giclee Print. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery. (bottom left) Freeze by James Burke, 2014, featuring mini Lego pieces. Courtesy of Bicha Gallery.
 
Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC

The concept is simple, thousands of original paintings, prints, sculptures and photographs all under one roof, ranging from $100-$10,000, with more than half priced under $5,000. The work of young, emerging artists hangs alongside household names, while a wall for recent graduates of local art schools, and the Art Students League of New York, provides a chance to snap up work by a future master.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Bottom Left) Davy & Kristin McGuire’s Fairies Series, mixed media video in jars from 360 by SHOPART, a print of the quintessential Greek, diner cup from the Rebecca Hossack Gallery.

This was my fifth visit to the Affordable Art Fair and yet, I still found myself inspired by the myriad of color frames, new concepts, and young buyers. The fair aims to make collecting universal, they even offer online guides for beginning a collection, framing or hanging art, or introducing art to children! Confused about gouache versus acrylic? Why not use the fair’s glossary for media and techniques.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(Left) Plaster sculpture, Arching Specimen, 2013 by Umberto Kamperveen, (top middle) four Buddhas by Garam Lee.

Since 1999, the globally traveling event has  welcomed over 1.4 million people and have garnered over $316 million sales in art, with fairs in cities including London, Bristol, Amsterdam, Brussels, New York, Singapore, Hamburg, Mexico City, Rome, Milan, Seattle, Stockholm and Hong Kong.

Affordable Art Fair 2014 Spring, NYC(top left) Nathan Vincent’s knit yarn and foam weapons and explosives, (top right) PURE EVIL serves as guest artist for Coates & Scarry gallery. Various, pop-art and spray-painted canvases faux drip to the floor in ‘Mel Ferrer’s Nightmare’ and Andy Warhol’s Nightmare, (bottom right) LuLuPa Hutong, Wood Cut, by Chinese, young artist Huang Kai.
 
AffordableArtFair_2014_4(top) Stitched Up by Katharine Morling (bottom left) Erica peruses the offerings from Uprise Art, an NYC-based collectors club (bottom right) Doublefaced No. 23 by Sebastian Bieniek. With eye-pencil and lipstick, Sebastian draws on the side of the model’s face creating portraits that are both humorous and somehow unsettling.

Way back in 1996, Will Ramsay opened Will’s Art Warehouse in southwest London to bridge the public’s increasing interest in contemporary art and London’s highbrow gallery scene. This eventually turned into the Affordable Art Fair. The founder explains, “I do not want art for a few any more than I want education for a few, or freedom for a few.” Here’s to art for everyone.

Article
0 comment

Fornasetti

Ever since I first saw the seemingly etched face of a woman named Lina Cavalieri dripping in black and white halftones from candles, plastered on the backs of chairs, and resting on pillowcases, I needed to learn more about this  obsessive motif.

Piero Fornasetti and Lina CavalieriLeft / Right

Piero Fornasetti, an Italian sculptor-cum-interior designer and renowned Milanese painter, found the face in a 19th century magazine clipping.  There is something calming and curious about Cavalieri’s likeness, a modern Mona Lisa, her eyes follow you. And yet, for how many times the face has been stamped onto a plate or other objet d’art, it never becomes boring. A face, like a pattern, like a friendly sister or relative, I’ve grown close to her symmetry.

Piero Fornasetti and Lina CavalieriLeft / Right Original Source Unknown 

“What inspired me to create more than 500 variations on the face of a woman?” he once asked of himself. “I don’t know…I began to make them and I never stopped.” To date, Cavalieri’s ubiquitous face has been manufactured in thousands of ways. The artist crafted over 13,000 products in his lifetime which spanned 1913-1988.

Piero Fornasetti and Lina CavalieriTop / Bottom Left / Middle 1 / Bottom Right

“I do not believe in eras or times. I do not. I refuse to establish the value of things based on time.” – Piero Fornasetti

[Read more]