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Wheel of Heels

‚ÄúRound-heeled‚ÄĚ is an old-fashioned label for a woman who is promiscuous. “Well-heeled” is a phrase which can have a few meanings, including “being wealthy” or “equipped with a weapon”. Why can’t we be a little bit of all three with the styles below? SIT! Now HEEL.

How to dress in nine different heel and platform options this Fall 2013 - including Kate Spade, Alexander Wang, J.Crew, Alexander McQueen and Michael Kors

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La Noche de Novia

La Noche de Novia, also referred to as a Berberisca, Soir√©e du Henn√©, Noche de Pa√Īos or Lilat el Henna, is a traditional Moroccan Jewish ceremony that takes place during the week that precedes a wedding. The bride makes her entrance, magnificently made up and dressed in the Berberisca gown called ‚ÄėTraje de pa√Īos‚Äô, ‚ÄúVestido de Berberisca‚ÄĚ (Spanish), or ‚ÄúKeswa Elkibra‚ÄĚ (Great Dress in Arabic). The costume is made of velvet, richly ornate and embroidered in gold thread. The family of the groom and bride, accompanied by close friends, gather to sing and to praise the bride. The tradition is 2,000 years old.

The ceremony has been famously depicted by many artists including Jean Bescancenot, Charles-Emile Vernet-Lecomte, Alfred Dehodencq, Camille Corot, and Fernand Georges Ducatillion. Most notably, the dress was recorded in several paintings and sketches by Eugene Delacroix, the master of the French Romantic school.

My husband’s family was expelled from Spain in 1492.¬†After the expulsion, following the inquisition, the family traveled to¬†Safed, Israel; Thessaloniki, Greece; and Meknes, Morocco.¬†They finally arrived in Fez, Morocco, during the 16th century and in the¬†mid-19th century, they moved to Tangier.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

I was lucky enough to have a Noche de Novia of my own. The special day was filled with joy, singing and laughter – not to mention alcohol and delicious food. Getting dressed for the reception took over an hour and gave me insight into the preparations such a special day must of taken in antiquity. There are dozens of pieces of the costume, each with a specific meaning, order and purpose – a belt (golel), headpiece (jemar), the jacket, the bodice, the laced sleeves (kmam) and more. Some of the items even have a superstitious and mystical connection to luck, fertility, and love.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

My dress came from overseas in Madrid, Spain. It had previously been worn by my husband’s mother and many of his cousins. I felt deeply honored to continue this tradition; especially to follow in the footsteps of many women who I respect. The beautiful ritual originates in the¬†Sephardi Jewish Communities of Northern Morocco and its surroundings; in cities such as Tangiers, Gibraltar¬†and especially Tetu√°n, which was also called ‚ÄúYerushalayim Haketana‚ÄĚ, the ‚ÄúLittle Jerusalem‚ÄĚ.

This ceremony is known in most¬†Jewish communities as the ‚ÄúHina‚ÄĚ, a name that symbolizes the three Mitzvot specific to the Jewish woman: Halla, Nida, VeHadlakat¬†HaNerot. Briefly, these actions mean¬†lighting the candles, separating portions of dough for the creation of Challah (bread), and ritual bathing and cleanliness.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

Aunts, cousins, friends, and other females related to the bride help her to get ready for her presentation. Each detail is just so – every pin, bobby pin and tassle is fussed with. More than anything, this time was for the bride to get to know her new family without her husband-to-be. This was a private time just for women.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

I adjust the headpiece so that it is just so. The necklaces are from an aunt in Paris, France, and the Moroccan earrings are from a family friend. The bracelet I am wearing is from my husband’s mom. In this way, I wear pieces of important women in the family. The international family, and the continuation of such “seemingly-antiquated” traditions is beautiful.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

The Puntaktel is worn under the Gonbaiz and as a close fitting breastplate made of heavily embroidered velvet.¬†The Hezam is a velvet and silk sash with ornate golden embroidered. It is wrapped around the bride’s waist several times.

La Noche de Novia Toledano

La Noche de Novia Toledano

Truly, a sign of the diaspora, I am happy to carry on traditions of a family who has been moved throughout the world often, whether due to persecution or economic need, and in each place picking up local customs and making them unique.

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Pattern Play

Sorry for my absence! The past month of my life has been a whirlwind – a wedding and a honeymoon. Yipeeeee. I guess I’m a WIFE now? Weird… There will be pictures to come soon (the world holds its breathe), but for now, let’s talk about patterns.

Marni’s Pattern Play Has Been Lauded for Years: From Gingham to Floral to Dots and Beyond!

Patterns are all around us, and technically speaking, are not a “man-made” invention.¬†¬†Natural patterns include¬†spirals¬†(like in seashells, or in the golden ratio),¬†waves,¬†ripples (in sand dunes from the wine),¬†tilings,¬†cracks, snowflakes, and those created by¬†symmetries¬†of¬†rotation¬†and¬†reflection. Almost all natural patterns has some underlying mathematical structure; think about the Fibonacci sequence or fern leaf fractals.

Although not quite organic, textile patterns seem to have an innate way of capturing our five sense – and maybe most in the sixth sense – style. Some say the sixth sense is paranormal activity or telepathy….but that’s just a rumor.

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Doesn’t everything look better with some symmetry – maybe ¬†a repeating line, circle or square.¬†

Gingham and other fun textile patterns!

Basic Blue: 1 // 2  |  Red Letter Day: 3 // 4 // 5  |  Yellow Fever: 6 // 7 // 8 // 9 

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P.S. Thanks to Pugly Pixel for their awesome Gingham patterns!