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Fort Greene

I am having a love affair with Brownstones. This isn’t the first time inanimate objects have caught my eye.  The building materials used in such homes are a brown Triassic or Jurassic era sandstone which was once an extremely popular building material. The term. “brownstone”, is also used on the East Coast (particularly Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and Maryland) of the United States to refer to a terraced house or rowhouse clad in this material. The stone is extremely durable, it also carries with it years of history and the connotations of another, quainter time period.

Fort Green Brownstone

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An office filing cabinet plays double duty as an entry table.
Fort Green Brownstone

Natural light in spades.
Fort Green Brownstone
Fort Green Brownstone

Fort Green Brownstone

Fort Green Brownstone

The low, stainless steel industrial table allows the space to feel historic yet contemporary. The mantlepiece is filled with vases ala Italian artist Morandi.

Fort Green Brownstone

Tonight’s cultural activeities in the salon include a rendition of the Metropolitan Opera’s version of Elektra, Op. 58, a one-act opera by Richard Strauss.

Fort Green Brownstone

According to color theory, an alizarin crimson red room gives the room sophistication and warmth. Red raises a room’s energy level. It’s affect is usually stimulating – raising heart rate or stimulating conversation. Fort Green Brownstone

As the esteemed author, poet, philosopher and muse, Jorge Luis Borges, once quipped, “I have always imagined that Paradise will be a kind of library.”

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The Armory Show

Every March, like the migration of strange Monarch butterflies, artists, galleries, collectors, critics and curators from across the globe make New York their destination during Armory Arts Week. From March 7-10, 2013, stationed at the Chelsea Piers 92 & 94 overlooking the Hudson, a hangar’s worth of creativity bustles in the largest NYC art fair. The fair has changed locations since its inaugural 1913 debut – from the East Side to Chicago to the Cincinnati Art Museum to Amherst College – ultimately that its coming back to its roots. The piers at the Armory Show, now designated as Contemporary and Modern, are devoted to showcasing the most important, notorious, and emerging artworks of the 20th and 21st centuries.
Erica and Max

My friends Max and Erica enjoy a Pain au chocolat, muffin, Diet Coke and Coffee in the VIP Lounge fitted by Roche Bobois.

The Armory Show 2013The Armory Show 2013

The Hudson River on the West Side of the island was once central to to the city’s trade and transportation infrastructure. With the success of the auto industry, American’s reliance on waterways diminished and all-but-halted. Businesses at the piers closed down and many structures were left to decay. The desolate, vacuous spaces could be dangerous territory but also offered temporary homes to various artist projects, the most illustrious, perhaps, being Gordon Matta-Clark’s iconic Day’s End on Pier 52 in 1974.

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Samsøn Projects of Boston had a booth arrayed with bongs, Carl Sagan and retail price tag fastener, featuring the works of Todd Pavlisko. 

The Armory Show 2013

The Armory Show 2013

Peter Liversidge, Ingelby Gallery London.

Peter Liversidge’s presented by Ingelby Gallery, London. Etc, 2011, neon.  Remember the seen from The King and I? Etcetera, Etcetera, Etcetera!

The Armory Show 2013
The Armory Show 2013 Destined to be a new Penguin ClassicLove Kicked Me Down (Where I Belong) by Harland Miller. 

The Armory Show 2013

The “Day’s End” Champagne Bar at the Armory Show Contemporary section. Little did you know that this Pommery Champagne bar is steeped in art history. The special light-bulb sculpture Day’s End, 2013, is site-specific installation by Peter Liversidge that references an eponymous work by Gordon Matta-Clarke on pier 52 from 1974-75; and Marcel Duchamp & Ulf Linde – Posterity Will Have a Word to Say, a special tribute to the 100th anniversary of the 1913 Armory Show, curated by Jan Åman. Drink up.

Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz Cary Leibowitz

Cary Leibowitz’s  installation from Invisible Exports was a little too on-the-nose with its pessimistic yet honest take on pie charts, cliches and children’s rhymes.

Kevin-Harman_ForeverKevin Harman, Forever, 2012, mirror, carved oak frames, padlock 137 x 88 x 26 cm. INGLEBY GALLERY.

James-Hugonin-Binary-Rhythm-III-2011James Hugging, Binary Rhythm (III), 2012, oil and wax on wood, 189.5 x 169 cm.  INGLEBY GALLERY.

The Armory Show 2013

Brian Calvin, Can With A Landscape (Robin), 2009.  The otherworldly, martian quality of the artist’s portraits is ominous. Alex Katz’s influence on Calvin seems obviously delightful.

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Girl on Fire

The leggings (straight from dance class, no pants meant no changing), the dangling door-knocker earrings , the bleached cropped hair, the kohl smudged eyeliner – these are the components of Edie Sedgwick that become stuff of legend. Emulated a hundred times over. Her fashion and style. Her speed-induced, lithe “je ne sais quoi“.

This troubled “It Girl”, early Warhol muse and trust-fund socialite lived a life so filled with her emotions, so spotted by her troubled feelings and so intense that her star went super nova, burned, collapsed in quick succession. The aspiring actress once  auditioned for Norman Mailer’s play The Deer Park, but Mailer thought she “wasn’t very good… She used so much of herself with every line that we knew she’d be immolated after three performances.” Her life, allegorically, was lived much like said audition.

What is not often discussed are her surrounding – not the people – but the furniture.

Edie Sedgwick's Apartment

Edie, originally from Santa Barbara, California, grew up on a ranch. She loved horses and could ride  from a young age. An excerpt from Patti Smith’s Just Kids, “‘The lady’s dead.’ Bobby called from California to tell me that Edie Sedgwick had died. I never knew her, but when I was a teenager, I found a copy of Vogue with a photograph of her pirouetting on a bed in front of a drawing of a horse. She seemed entirely self-possessed as if nobody in the world existed but her. I tore it out and put it on my wall. Bobby seemed genuinely stricken by her untimely death. “Write the little lady a poem,” he said and I promised I would. In writing an elegy to a girl like Edie, I had to access something of the girl in myself. Obliged to consider what it meant to be female, I entered the core of my being, led by the girl posed before a white horse (176).”

Featuring Jonathan Adler's Rhinoceros

For someone so avant-garde and on the cusp of the pop-culture world of glitz and glam, Edie’s stately room was subdued. It reeked of her socialite, New England-drenched upbringing. In a way, it seemed almost grandmotherly.

Shop by the Numbers:

  1. TargetThreshold™ Exploded Floral Toss Pillow in Blue. Threshold is the new Target Home rebrand and features an assortment of entertaining essentials, accents and well-designed, decorative accessories. Riding and equestrian influences are everywhere in the collection, from the leather handles on a hammered silver serving buckets to a horse silhouette on an outdoor rug.
  2. Target – Threshold™ Floral Sham in Beige. Go crazy for paisley.
  3. CMQ Studio – An 8×10 Giclee Print of an Arabian Stallion horse. The ink sketch is titled Wild Stallion. The illustration features a loose sketch technique.
  4. One King’s Lane – 1970’s Mark Hapton Chintz Sofa. The Charming chintz sofa is from a Washington, DC home designed by Mark Hampton, covered in a chintz fabric of his own design. It’s kitschy yet comfortable, muted yet loud.
  5. Jonathan Adler – Pets without the responsibility! Jonathan fell in love with these Rhinos while traveling in England. They make a great footstool or occasional seat or a great topic of conversation the next time you entertain. These animals are handcrafted from top quality, full grain leather and no two animals are exactly the same.
  6. Lamp’s Plus – Wrought Iron Pavilion Wall Candle Holder. Edie once almost burned down her apartment because she left candles unattended. A wall sconce is an easier (and safer) way to be a bit careless. The flowing curves of this candle holder will brighten up a room even before the candle is lit. Made of sturdy wrought iron in a natural looking rust finish.

It’s not that I’m rebelling. It’s that I’m just trying to find another way. – Edie Sedgwick