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Mixology (15)

Bathing Suit: ¬†Mara Hoffman’s ruffle-detailed¬†multicolored¬†Aztec-print bikini will add a burst of brights to your swimwear collection. Image found HERE.¬†/ Room: A geometric Aztec print rug with bright colors that have Peruvian and Mexican flair. The spartan wood and stark white walls give the environment a “ranch” quality. A rocking chair brings a southwestern, old-country vibe to the modern space. Image found HERE.

Bathing Suit: Bring the Safari to your body with this We Are Handsome ‚Äď The Mother, womens multi coloured one piece swimsuit with a low scooped neckline. The swimsuit is fully lined (so you do not have to worry about see-through nip slips…phew!) and also features a deep scooped rear and the eye-catching ‚ÄėThe Mother‚Äô elephant photographic print. Image found HERE.¬†/ Room: ¬†Remember the days of shipping your clothes in a trunk on summer holiday to Africa? The plush, navy, velvet couch captures the opulence of the late 1800’s while the wallpaper is the color of a Savannah sunset.¬†Photo courtesy of Peppermint Bliss; photo by Emily Anderson. Image found HERE.

Bathing Suit:¬†One Piece Swimsuit¬†by Hanne Bloch.¬†The¬†seventies inspired halter one piece comes in a¬†classic multi-color knit and is¬†finished with the designer’s signature flirty silver tassels. The¬†designer Hanne Bloch’s philosophy is that a wardrobe¬†should complement the beach or pool-side as much as it does a night out. Image found HERE.¬†/ Room: The vibrant patterned rug, the natural fibers (cottons, woods, etc) all play into the easy yet bright calm vibe of this room. The wire mesh coffee table in a cerulean blue gives a quirky vibe and directly contrast the color play of the orange and purple hues. Brighter is better. Image found HERE.¬†

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First Impression(ism)

Impressionism¬†is a 19th-century art movement¬†that originated with a group of Paris-based artists that included Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro,¬†Berthe Morisot, Mary Cassatt, Alfred Sisley and¬†Pierre-Auguste Renoir. The movement was extremely radical for the time period and received¬†harsh opposition from the galleries, judges, and overall art community in France. There are about 7,856 things I would love to elucidate and discuss about the movement but for now let’s stick with the general oeuvre of an impressionist paining:

  • Open¬†composition (meaning not constrained to the rectangle of the canvas, leaving the impression that the image is “open” or somehow unfinished)
  • Tiny, thin and visible brushstrokes (these vary depending on artist’s technique)
  • A huge focus on an accurate portrayal of how light changes color and reflects off surfaces
  • Movement painted on canvas as it is pot rayed by the human eye (think about a slow shutter speed on your camera and how it produces a blurring effect)
  • Unusual angles and points of view
  • Daily, every day occurrences (this is in stark opposition to the then contemporary and in fashion painting of still lifes, portraits, allegories, and important historical scenes)

I have often wanted to live inside the soft, bright, floral yet hazy world of an impressionist painting, so here I will try using home goods to recreate a composition’s color array.¬†

 Mary Cassatt, Lydia Leaning on Her Arms (in a theatre box), 1879

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Camille Pissarro,¬†Hay Harvest at √Čragny,1901,¬†National Gallery of Canada,¬†Ottawa,Ontario

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Claude Monet, Woman with a Parasol, (Camille and Jean Monet), 1875, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

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Pierre-Auguste Renoir,¬†Julie Manet¬†with cat,¬†1887,¬†Mus√©e d’Orsay

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Before the industrial revolution it was extremely hard to paint outside, a technique also known as “en plain air”.¬†This is due to the fact that artists needed to mix their paints indoors by grinding powders, oils, and other chemicals themselves. With the first creation of pre-made¬†paints in tubes (resembling ¬†toothpaste¬†tubes) artists were able to travel freely outside painting from the easel. Imagine this new freedom!

It is hard to believe that this style of painting was once so controversial and contentious that the paintings were rejected by several art schools and critics. People would GASP at the canvases. Today the manner of the impressionist hand, and the idea of painting freely, permeates our culture. The word impressionism as coined by Louis Leroy, a 19th century artist, playwright, journalist, and art critic, was originally meant to be a scathing and satiric review, ”¬†Impression‚ÄĒI was certain of it. I was just telling myself that, since I was impressed, there had to be some impression in it … and what freedom, what ease of workmanship! Wallpaper in its embryonic state is more finished than that seascape.” Instead of taking the term as an insult, the artists of the group decided to adopt it to call themselves “impressionists” and the ¬†rest, as they say, is history. An inspiring and “impressing” story, no?

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Ben-Day Dots – An Artist’s Dwelling (9)

The¬†Ben-Day dots¬†printing¬†process, named after¬†illustrator¬†and printer¬†Benjamin Henry Day, Jr. and¬†is similar to¬†Pointillism (Think of¬†¬†Georges Seurat‘s¬†The¬†Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte¬†and how it changes from an amalgam of tiny dots to a fully shaded image based on one’s proximity to the canvas). Depending on the effect, color and¬†optical illusion¬†needed, small colored dots are closely spaced, widely spaced or overlapping to create the illusion of shadow, color, and dimension. These dots differ from the printing process in newspapers (ever notice those little dots on the edges of a page) – those are halftone dots or dot gain – and differ from the Ben-Day dot in that they come in many sizes, circumferences, spacing and diameters. Ben-Day dots are able to express an image while all dots on the page remain the same size. ¬†Most people are familiar with Ben-day dots without even realizing. Why? The simple answer is Western-style comic books from the 1950’s and 1960’s.

Puma 917 ‚Äď Popart Pack ‚Äď Roy Lichtenstein

Hi! I am a Ben-Day dot, all the circles above are the same size!

Hi! I am a Halftone dot, I help to create images with dots of different sizes. 

Pulp comic books used benday dots in primary colors to inexpensively create the secondary colors such as flesh tone.¬†The dotting technique was also an inexpensive way for artists and printers to create shading and depth.¬†Ben-Day dots were considered the hallmark of American pop-artist¬†Roy Lichtenstein,¬†who enlarged and exaggerated them in many of his paintings and sculptures.¬†In addition to appropriating comic books‚Äô melodramatic content, Lichtenstein manually simulated the Benday dots used in the mechanical reproduction of images. One is not supposed to actually “see the dots” in images however, in Lichtenstein’s paintings the dots are over-sized and a central tenant. In this way, the painter is taking something robotic and manual (and hidden) and forcing to be the organic, man-made focus of the canvas.

 Roy Lichtenstein, Drowning Girl, 1963

The artist himself explains, “I was interested in the fact that the cartoon faces and so forth were so unreal and that we took them, generally for realistic. If you go through the magazine, the girl looked pretty in the picture, you know. Then when you really look at what you’ve got‚ÄĒblack lines and red lips‚ÄĒthat there isn’t anything in this picture that’s real. I was interested in say, the style of, say, a pretty girl in a comic book, or a hero, whatever it was manufactured out of a kind of idealism as to what people should look like, modified by economies of the printing process.” ¬†There is also a dark-humor inherent in Lichtenstein’s ability to make-fun of a character’s death, or the dramatic narrative of a comic book, by oversimplifying it in large format.

ROY¬†LICHTENSTEIN’S STUDIO, AS PHOTOGRAPHED BY¬†HORST; TAKEN FROM ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST’S ‚ÄúCELEBRITY HOMES II‚ÄĚ, 1981.

Comic books and printing techniques are often very focused on properly recreating a human character by using mechanical means. However, I am more interested in how these “dots” can recreate the oeuvre and warmth of a living space. In Interior Series by Roy Lichtenstein the idea of a “home” is explored and mocked. The prints of the Interior Series are banal domestic environments inspired by furniture ads he found in telephone books.¬†The Interiors are based on advertisements, most of which Lichtenstein cut from the Yellow Pages – further challenging the idea of and blurring the lines between “low art, commercial art, and high art”.

 

Photographer Laurie Lambrecht worked as a part-time assistant to Pop artist Roy Lichtenstein from 1990 to 1992, helping him to inventory his studio in preparation for his 1993 retrospective at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in Manhattan.

The Interiors, one of the artist’s major final series, portray colorful magazine spreads of rooms for purchase. With the artist’s usual dry wit, they depict domestic spaces, occasionally occupied by Nudes from his other late series.¬†his body of colorful paintings and prints reflects the excess of the 1980s. I was lucky enough to view one of these LARGE format paintings in person at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and let me tell you they are massive, mural sized pieces. They are almost the size of the room they are trying to portray and give the effect of actually being in a real room (which is incredible seeing as though they are all on a 2d plane). They hit you in the face like¬†Whaam!

La Sortie by Roy Lichtenstein. Image found HERE.

Image found HERE. 

Roy Lichtenstein’s Interior with Skyline. I spy a Saarinen design.

Wallpaper with blue floor interior by Roy Lichtenstein. Image found HERE.

Modern Room by Roy Lichteinstein. Image found HERE. I spy mid-century modern and an homage to Warhol.

The Den by Roy Lichtenstein. Image found HERE.

Image from Roy Lichtenstein: Interiors, by  Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Fitzpatrick, Dorothy Lichtenstein printed by Hudson Hills, 1999., pg. 58

The Living Room by Roy Lichteinstein. Image found HERE.

Roy Lichtenstein РInterior with Red Wall Рlot 47 Р$7,026,500, est. $8 to 12 million via ArtNet. Roy Lichtenstein’s 10 foot tall Interior with Red Wall (1991), as seen above, sold to a telephone bidder for $6.2 million ($7,026,500 with fees) against a pre-sale estimate of $8 million-$10 million. I spy lots of Knoll inspired design items. Zap! Bang! Whoosh!

So how can you live in this mechanically produced Ben-Day dot world of excess, consumerism, pop and color? Have no fear! Zing! Swoosh! Zap! Hint: stick to CMKY or RGB tones, meaning Yellows, Reds, Green, Blue, and other primaries. Look here:

 

Shop by the Numbers: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11a / 11b / 12