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Chartreuse

Oh how do I love this color, let me count the ways: it’s exactly halfway between yellow and green, it has a citrus-like hue, it’s both cheery yet, moody, AND it’s named after alcohol. Could this so called “apple-green” color (more Granny Smith, than Washington or Fuji) get any better? The answer? YES.

Bold chartreuse wallpaper pops against crisp white bedding and carpeting.Design consultant Alison Booth, owner of Booth Supply, reupholstered a chair from her grandmother in a bright polka-dot print and swapped white lampshades for matching blue ones. From Canadian House and Home, HERE.

The shades in this seventies meets South Beach home are inspired by seaglass! Photographed by Ted Yarwood and designed by Timothy Mather. From Canadian House and Home, HERE.

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There were two French¬†liqueurs, one referred to as yellow chartreuse (introduced in 1838), and the other as green chartreuse (introduced in 1764). Each type of the aforementioned liqueur was made by Roman Catholic monks in the¬†Chartreuse¬†mountain range¬†in eastern¬†France. That’s a lot of chartreuse terminology. So, are you following this transitive etymology? The monks were located in the mountains, the mountains were named Chartreuse, the monks named the liquid after the the mountains, the world named the color after the liquor, thus the color is named after the mountains.¬†Side note:¬†:¬†Liqueurs are for nuts (hazelnuts, almonds), cordials are for fruit (lemon, orange, etc).

I am loving this restored entryway table. Check out the “second-coating, HERE.¬†

The ¬†original liquor formula is said to call for 130 herbs, flowers, and¬†secret ingredients¬†combined in a wine alcohol base meant to be a type of alchemical “elixir of long life”. The monks intended the recipe to be used as medicine, but with saffron coloring and¬†40% alcohol (80 proof), it is more likely to cause cirrhosis of the liver, then longevity. But, in moderation, the cocktails are phenomenal, and the color is even better. It is thought that the closest naturally occurring chartreuse-like color is that of the Anjou or Bartlett Pear, algae, lovebird, grass, or lime. Since its hue oscillates between yellow, green, and sometimes a warm olive green-brown it can also be used as a form of camouflage color.

Room designed by Chelsea Aterlier Architect, PC.¬†¬†I love the interplay of materials: plastic, glossy surfaces, aluminum, glass, wood, steel, and lucite. It’s almost like an entire factory is mingling.

This damask and metallic space is a little ostentatious but also extremely luxe. Dining room designed by EJ Interiors, HERE.

Must love birds. Chinoiserie meets high tea meets the ornithological society of America. Room designed by Katie Ridder Rooms.

It’s like a zebra found its way into a paint can! Dining room design via Cynthia Mason Interiors, HERE.

Because the yellow-green is a naturally occuring tincture it plays well with other natural floral colors such as tangerine oranges, baby blues, salmon pinks, and various grapefruit shades.

This small, modern, Chicago, ranch living room was designed by Interiors by Mary Susan, HERE.

Warren Platner’s famous steel wire chairs for Knoll, here in Betsey Johnson’s dining room, found¬†HERE.

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Via.

The sweeping silhouette of this table is reminiscent of the Tulip table designed by Eero Saarinen, one of Platner’s first bosses.¬†“Midcentury modernism resonates for me,” says Adler, who paired Warren Platner’s 1966 dining table from¬†Design Within Reach¬†with his own Chinese Chippendale chairs. The chandelier is from the 1970s. Curtains are Hinson’s Montauk Texture in Aegean, the same fabric used for the living room curtains and ottoman. Image found¬†HERE via House Beautiful.

HOW CAN YOU LIVE IN A BOTTLE OF CHARTREUSE LIQUER?

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My Week in Snapshots: 4/23/2012 ‚Äď 4/29/2012

I am surprised I did not need to be rolled to this computer in order to write this post. But really, this week was basically dedicated to gustatory delights and rich cuisine! Here are a few photos taken straight from my iPhone so that you can see the calories through mine own eyes. At the start of the week I was visiting my new nephew Zachary Fionn (and helping to change diapers, feed babies, empty the dishes, and make food for the family) , and during the rest of the week I was back in NYC at my new JOB.

  1. ¬†My sister’s kitchen is simple, clean, and a little rustic. The layered candles, rattan chairs, and mirrored sconces help to create an inviting space. However, my absolutely favorite piece is the Mason Jar Chandelier, found HERE. No longer are canning jars just for pickling!
  2. We had not one, but TWO dinner parties, this week in the Chelsea walkup. Apartment 9 was bustling with the smells of the kitchen, the laughter of friends, and a lot of wine. On Saturday night, our guests asked if they could bring dessert – OF COURSE WE SAID YES. Lydia and Marcia brought this phenomenally decorate caked purchased at The Riviera Bakehouse in Ardsley, NY. My savory tooth is usually much stronger than my sweet tooth, but the icing on this cake was perfectly done – not too overly sweet. How adorable is that chocolate bee buzzing on a flower petal?
  3. While bored one night I decided to paint my nails in an ombre palette of colors – baby blue, navy, and Prussian blue. Inspired by THIS.
  4. Michael and my good friend Joanna is leaving the auspices of NYC in order to make it big in LA! She is going to be a a famous comedy writer! She also¬†blogs, interviews, and was the Photo Gallery Editor for the New York Daily News. She is generally snarky, loves puppies, and is television enthusiast. ¬†This Saturday morning was her going-away brunch at Esperanto!¬†This $11.95 prix fixe brunch comes with coffee, a mimosa, and an entree (above is the Huevos Rancheros). YOU CANNOT beat that.¬†Straight from¬†Jo’s twitter account, she writes – “The last brunch (where’s Jesus?)”:
  5. For your viewing pleasure, my Benjamin Moore Paint Chalk-wall, side by side. Number 5 is Friday’s Shabbat Dinner menu: Russet Potato Medley, Red Snapper in Moroccan Salt Rub with White Wine Sauce, and Mustard Seed and Panko Crusted Shrimp (how kosher). We also played¬†CRANIUM¬†until the wee hours of the morning.
  6. Number 6 is Saturday’s menu:¬†Charcuterie, Garlic Bread, Lemon Ponzu Asparagus, and Chicken Puttanesca! This dinner actually beat the dinner from the night before, according to unanimous voting.
  7. I have an olive addiction. Recently I have tried to cure my own olives (with salt not lye) but have failed miserably. Anyone have any good recipes and suggestions? The green olives in the forefront are my favorite varietal,¬†Cerignola, from Italy. ¬†Did you know that all olives are technically green and only change color (to black or purple) because of sun exposure, nutrient richness, and maturation? If you scratch off the skin of ANY black olive, you will find some green hiding underneath. ALSO, never ever ever eat a freshly picked olive…blegh.
  8. I don’t think I have ever turned down the chance to eat Nutella on anything. The giant jar in this photo is $90 dollars and is filled with 11 lbs of Nutella. These photos are from Bar Suzette Creperie. ¬†They even have TRUFFLE CREPES.
  9. My sister was craving some major comfort foods so I made a tuna, mac, cheese, peas, carrots, and breadcrumbs casserole! It tasted like a take on a Shepherd’s Pie. Don’t you love those bright cast iron pots? My favorite is¬†Le Creuset¬†Cookware.
  10. This carved wooden artwork was part kitsch, part tiki, and part Coney-Island. It had a goofy sense of humor that kept me amused. In the East Village, Esperanto is  decorated colorfully, with Latin-themed pictures, ornaments hanging from the ceiling, and a faux sheet metal shack with random cruise-ship doors. I wish I knew what artist made this hysterical wall ornament!
What did YOU do this week?
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Hey Arnold!

My good friend Andrew Springer works for Good Morning America on ABC. He is the guru for all things television and is often spotted reading a hard cover, non-fiction book on the history of the medium. No really, this kid has a killer commute and refuses to switch over to e-books, he likes dog-earing the pages and feeling the paper! But, I digress, Springer is my go-to grand poobah on the history of network television and the rise of certain thematic media trends. He was actually my friend who suggested I do a post on The Mary Tyler Moore Show’s interior design and set design, HERE.¬†I recently asked him for his next suggestions – I was thinking of recreating the look from the oh-so-eighties “Clarissa Explains it All” but he suggested another Nickelodeon classic, Hey Arnold!. He texted me, “Remember his TOTALLY AWESOME bedroom?”. I do remember his bedroom, and I think the space officially accounts for the first time I was ever jealous of a cartoon. I think the creators of the cartoon even knew how cool it was since they dedicated an¬†entire episode to its powers.

The cartoon Hey Arnold! was created by Craig Bartlett¬†(author of Rugrats)¬†and premiered in 1996. It ran for five seasons, had exactly 100 episodes, and…. Bartlett originally set out ¬†to become a painter “in the 19th-century sense”, but started pursuing a career in animated films because of inspiration he found during a trip to Italy. It also did not hurt that Matt Groening, the creator of¬†The Simpsons, is Craig Bartlett’s brother-in-law.¬†This new career turn brought him to claymation and¬†Pee-wee’s Playhouse¬†(another cult classic), it turns out Arnold was actually a minor character spun-off from this series, and was originally greenlit as¬†¬†“Arnold Saves the Neighborhood”.

Hey Arnold!¬†takes place in the fictional American city of Hillwood. The nebulous city seems to be based on large, metropolitan ¬†cities, including¬†Seattle, Washington;¬†Portland, Oregon;¬†and¬†New York City¬†with sporadic references to Nashville, TN and¬†Allentown, PA, as mentioned in the Sally’s Comet Episode. Basically, the city is an amalgam of urban Americana. The series chronicles the¬†life of Arnold, a 4th-grader in a nameless city , who lives in a multi-racial boarding house with his grandparents and a motley assortment of neighbors and friends. He is a reluctant hero, problem solving, and always forced to “do the right thing”. I learned several things from Hey Arnold!;¬†how to spell the word “qualm”, to never eat raspberries, to never try to make a pig listen, how to judge hitting baseballs in the wind, saw my first televised bar mitzvah, the plight of refugees of The Vietnam War and adoption in tore worn countries (Mr. Hyunh and his a daughter, Mai), and a million lessons on ‘not judging a book by its cover’.

“The boy with the cornflower hair. Me beloved, and my despair.” – Helga

Image found HERE.

SO HOW DO I RECREATE THIS BEDROOM SO THAT STOOP KID WILL BE AFRAID TO LEAVE THE STOOP (and stay in the house?) The skylight is key, with a modern meets industrial vibe.

Image found HERE.

A modern day rendering and replica of Hey Arnold’s Room, HERE.

Image by Lotta Agaton, via HERE.

Image found HERE.

Image found HERE.

Van Vorst Park ‚ÄĒ Jersey City, New Jersey, Image found¬†HERE.

Image found HERE.

Arnold had a very 1960’s to 1970’s anthropomorphic and avocado/orange rug. His walls was a blue green with alien print and ufos on the. His bedspread and blanket were a solid seafoam color. He had a very funky starburst, Eames style clock on one wall. Some of the details were very nifty-fifities diner-esque. He had a dusty pink modular storage unit with space for books, knickknacks and orange drawers. In the middle of the room sat an old car Bench Seat¬†(or diner booth?)¬†in red upholstery. He had a radiator, a fish tank, a PC, flowers, a show rack, an oblong egg chair, and he had track lighting. Somehow both urban, inexpensive, and modern.

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What is your favorite TV bed room?

P.S. All screencaps found HERE.