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An Artist’s Dwelling (4)

Egon Schiele was an Austrian painter and protege of the Austrian symbolist (and lover of the female body), Gustav Klimt. Schiele is most famous for his twisted bodies, hyper sexualized sketches, grotesque, and almost endless self-portraits. He is considered an early expressionist painter who leans toward figurative painting. Figurative art is considered to be drawn from actual objects or persons – therefore it is representational rather than based in imagination. Expressionist painting allows the artist to transform works based solely on emotion and subjective perspectives and distortions – often these works are not in the realm of “the real”. Technically speaking an expressionism painting and a figurative painting are at odds with one another – one aims to be wholly based in “fact” and the other in “feeling”. This dichotomy adds a layer of beautiful confusion to Schiele’s paintings.

Egon Scheile, The Little City II (View from Bohemian Krumlov), 1912-1913, Oil on Canvas (Wikipedia Commons)

Egon Schiele, Fräulein Beer, 1914, Oil on Canvas (Wikipedia Commons)

Early in the artist’s career, while studying with Klimt, he met a woman named Valery (Wally) Neuzil. Some consider this woman to be a mistress of Klimt, however she appeared as a model in Schiele’s works as well. Together, they escaped what they considered “the conservative society” of Vienna to the countryside of Neulengbach. The rent was inexpensive because it was so far from this city (what Brooklyn is the NYC). This allowed Schiele to afford more space for his studio.  This home became a gathering place for many delinquents and children in the area – it was also where Schiele painted several youths in questionably pornographic situations (many of whom were considered below the age of consent). Paris von Guetersloh, a young artist who was Schiele’s contemporary, remembered that the establishment was overrun with them:

They slept, recovered from beatings administered by parents, lazily lounged about – something they were not allowed to do at home – combed their hair, pulled their dresses up or down, did up or undid their shoes … like animals in a cage which suits them, they were left to their own devices, or at any rate believed themselves to be.

Egon Schiele, Kauernde

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Blood Orange

Why not decorate my house like a fruit salad? I love lemons, tangelos, pomelos, tangerines, grapefruit, lime, and all citrus fruits for their bold and juicy color patterns. But, no fruit is more fashion-forward than THE BLOOD ORANGE.  The distinctive dark flesh color is due to the presence of anthocyanins, a family of pigments common to many flowers but uncommon in citrus fruits. According to botanists, the blood orange is likely derived from a mutation of the sweet orange, and is much smaller than a regular orange. The fruit’s peak season in U.S. Supermarkets is probably  from December to March (Texas groves), and from November to May (California groves). The orange is known to originally come from China but is now grown primarily in Italy (what a Jetsetter). Some say the oranges are maroon, other times they appear red, and when the pigment drains to the outer vesicles of the fruit, they let off an almost pinkish vibe. Of course, the outer skin still remains (you guessed it) – orange.

(Here.)

(Pink + Orange = Blood Orange.  Sources via my Pinterest Board HERE.)

(Via Isle of View – Faces of Love’s Pinterest)

(Brabourne Farm.)

(I am absolutely loving the idea of two separate curtain colors for the same window. Via the deceased magazine Domino – may it rest in peace!)

(The wood palette bed, the granny square quilts, the joyous pom-pom ceiling display! Via Ashley Ann Photography.)

(Believe it or not, that is NOT wallpaper – it is an all over stencil design created by The Royal Design Studio.)

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Panel Discussion

Avocado Stoves are probably my absolute favorite interior designing dinosaur left over from the 1970’s.  Close seconds include a fully wallpapered kitchen and orange formica countertops. Something about the aforementioned items will always feel trapped in a time warp. However, there has been an item from the seventies that is having an evolutionary  and fashionable resurgence – Wood Panelling.

(From Elmira Stove Works by Northstar.)

(Photo by Adrian on Flickr)

(This gaudy and match match interior was found in a 1971 Better Homes & Gardens via HERE.)

Panelling includes  any wall covering constructed from rigid or semi-rigid components. These are traditionally interlocking wood, but could be plastic or other materials. There are even specific names for the locking components: Tongue and Groove (which sounds like a great band name). In antiquity, wood panelling was first used to make cold stone walls more comfortable and inviting. The wood also served as insulation from the chilly castle walls or stone interiors. In more modern buildings, that did not need environmental insulations, the technique is mostly used for decoration – showing off ornate engraving, beveling, wainscoting (usually on oak), and as a way to show off contemporary artists of the day. The most intricate form of paneling is known as boiserie. As a note, and a fun future trivial pursuit or jeopardy answer, the word “wainscot” is from [wageschot, Dutch] and means the inner wooden covering of a wall (To wainscot [waegenschotten, Dutch], to line the walls with boards) – found here.

(Perhaps I should begin getting all of my fashion and interior design cues from JamesFranco.com? – which has not been updated in years. This is an image from the set of Freaks and Geeks , meant to take place in 1980, Michigan.)

(Note the wainscoting – from the set of That 70’s Show, meant to the place in 1976-1979 ,Wisconsin. Found Here.)

OK, now let us hop into the DeLeorean and reach speeds of 88 Miles Per Hour so that we can travel to the year 2012 where panelling has actually been reinvented. (How do I spell “panelling?” or “paneling” because neither is being corrected by autocorrect!? Are both right!? Interrobang!?) Modern panels often feature unfinished, untreated wood for a sleek, clean, and light wall.

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