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The Surrealist Life – Mixology (33)

My father-in-law is a great fan of Joan Miro. The Spanish Catalan artist was born in Barcelona, Spain in 1893. His canvases are filled with almost calligraphic strokes of color, reminiscent of folksy doodles. His surrealist and abstract forms are both modern and yet, somehow very ancient…almost like drawings found at the paleolithic Lascaux Caves in France.

Miro created a series of paintings known as peinture-poésie, these wild forms contained loosely brushed fields of tone, and were inspired by art’s relationship to language, particularly poetry. Very cognizant of color choice, he once wrote of the color blue, “ceci est la couleur de mes rêves” (this is the color of my dreams).

Surrealist Lifestyle Items by The Walkup inspired by Joan Miro

  1. Set of 3 Himmeli Air Plant Hangers by HRUSKAA
  2. Bau Pendant Lamp by Normann Copenhagen
  3. Teepee Triangle Ring by House of Harlow 1960
  4. Christophe Joubert Printed Tote by Marni
  5. Giant Graphic Dot Pleat Dress by SUNO
  6. Distortion Candle in Blue by Areaware
  7. New York Idiom Hinged Forever And Ever Bangle in Metropolis Green by Kate Spade
  8. Lithograph After Joan Miro (3E) from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.  A sandbox for the subconscious mind, a re-creation of the childlike manifestation’s of Miro’s Catalan pride.
  9. Scope Rug by CB2
  10. Artisan Mixer in Electric Blue by KITCHENAID
  11. Jumbo Spoon Rest by BIA Cordon Bleu
  12. Sonneman Quattro LED Task Lamp in Red/Yellow/Black from Gracious Home
  13. QUERELLE D’AMOUREUX lithograph by Joan MIRO from Invaluable, the world’s premier auctions.
  14. Red Press Coffee Maker in Red designed by Erik Magnussen by Stelton

For me an object is something living. This cigarette or this box of matches contains a secret life much more intense than that of certain human beings. — Joan Miro

If you’re looking to be inspired by other paintings, visit Invaluable to browse a huge selection of paintings and other artwork. Life can imitate art!

Other Surrealist Sundries:
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Falling for Autumn

The crisp in the air, the spotted gourds, the harvest pumpkins, the flint corn and the bales of hay: things I love about the final quarter of the year. In the northeast, especially in New York, we feel the four seasons quite distinctly. Although I might be pretty isolated from expansive farmland, we Brooklynites still feel the harvest season in special ways.

Pernille Folcarelli Unika Hand Prints of leaves, feathers and herbs

Pernille Folcarelli’s Unika Hand Leaf Prints

The sunday farmer’s market carries arugula, apples, chard, chestnuts and Crispin apples (my husband’s favorite – juicy and tart). Sweater weather also brings the best layering fashions. I am a sucker for heavy-knits. Finally, the leaves! In Carroll Gardens, I happen to be pretty close to some of the trees planted in the Million Trees Project, a citywide, public-private program with an ambitious goal: to plant and care for one million new trees across the City’s five boroughs over the next decade. The foliage on my street is astounding! I also happen to have a 70 year old dogwood tree in my backyard.

Pernille Folcarelli Unika Hand Prints of leaves, feathers and herbs

Pernille Folcarelli’s Unika Hand Leaf Prints

The various shades of the deciduous trees and shrubs on my walk to work range from fire-engine reds, to a crimson brick, to cornmeal yellow, sunset oranges, tyrian purple, and worn-leather brown. The tones are inspiring.

Harvest Season, Autumn Decor and Fashion via The Walkup blog

  1. Leaf Print Shirt by Christophe Lemaire 
  2. Falling Leaves Necklace by J.Crew 
  3. Special Fit Harvest Sunglasses in Crazy Tort by Karen Walker 
  4. Frappa Pillow by Crate and Barrel 
  5. Votive Set in Dark Rum, Vetiver and Tobacco by Malin + Goetz
  6. Leaf Suede Chukka Boot 69 CA in Ruby Wine by Vans 
  7. Fall for Autumn hat by Wooden Ships
  8. Pearl Branch Earrings by Shaun Leane 

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.” ― Albert Camus

Botanists and scientist know a lot about this yearly phenomenon. As the trees are ridding themselves of chlorophyll and reabsorbing it along with other nutrients like nitrogen, potassium, and phosphorous to store them for the winter, they also suddenly begin to expend energy creating anthocyanin. Chlorophyll normally masks the yellow pigments known as xanthophylls and the orange pigments called carotenoids — both visible when the green chlorophyll is gone.  We understand the chemical changes of the colors, but plenty of questions still remain to as to ‘why’.