I happen to love the planet upon which we live. I even like it’s color scheme: 70% ocean blue, 25% gritty caramel crust, and a sundry 5% beautiful sulfurs, gems and other colorful carbons and chemicals.

Whole Earth CatalogThe Last Whole Earth Catalog: Access to Tools (1971)  The WHOLE EARTH CATALOG functioned as an evaluation and access device. With it, the user should know better what is worth getting and where and how to do the getting. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. Published regularly from 1968 to 1972, this tome led the counterculture back-to-the-land eschewing industrialism. 
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Although the Earth has seemingly been around for 4.54 billion years (but who’s counting?), Earth Day was only first celebrated in 1970, and is now coordinated globally by more than 192 countries each year. We humans were a little late to the game of terrestrial appreciation.

Earth Day 2014 from The Walkup featuring Aesop, West Elm, Great Dane and more!

Yesterday was Easter in New York City. The brownstone lined streets were finally blooming cherry blossoms and dogwoods. The windows in industrial lofts of factories of yore were glinting and gleaming. The bulbs planted in apartment window units were peaking through moist soil.  I even spotted someone dressed in a bunny costume.

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

For those of us who did not have a family dinner, or whose relatives are somewhere far away – California, Texas, Illinois – there are always local friends. My husband’s colleague, and good friend, invited us over to their gorgeous TriBeCa loft for something called a Groupmuse. In the afternoon light, the minimal and mid-century inspired home looked glorious!

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

A Groupmuse is halfway between a chamber music concert and a house party. It’s equal parts musical and social. Using the power of the internet, Groupmuse has launched a way to support local musicians by fostering chamber music house parties. One can host, attend or play in unorthodox settings bringing back the idea of the original parlor concert or salon. It feels simultaneously nostalgic or antiquated yet futuristic – a clever juxtaposition.

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

We had the pleasure of experiencing a solo suite for Cello by Bach (Chaconne in D minor), as well as an Hungarian duo (Op. 7) by Zoltán Kodály. During it all, the wine was flowing, the crudités were crunching, and my husband and I were making new friends in an intimate and culturally invigorating space. The two talented young musicians, Sebastian Baverstam, playing the cello, and Emily Smith, playing the violin, were so open and accessible after their performance ended. We asked questions and easily conversed. The event became an easy and far-from-elitist way to understand classical music.

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

I love the idea of music accessibility, and bringing its comforts to the home, rather than an intimidating concert hall, opera hall or architecturally important venue. So often live performance is seen as academic and esoteric – now Groupmuse aims to create a new audience for the important notes of Tchaikovsky, Dvorak and composers being forgotten by the young.

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

Groupmuse, in essence, is a social network that directly connects musicians, audience members, and willing hosts, so that the community can organically generate its own house concerts, and so that the classical music experience becomes as socially appealing as it is musically appealing, as part of a radical new effort to introduce classical music to Millenials.

TriBeCa Groupmuse, Classical Music for the Masses!

Started in Boston, the performances have now expanded to San Francisco and New York City. Join the social symphony!